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BT Engineer's Visit

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BT Engineer's Visit

The BT engineer finally made his visit.
He replaced the corroded connection box with an NT5E master socket.
Tests carried out by the engineer on the complete circuit before and then from the test socket afterwards showed a 41% improvement.
I disconnected the bell wire and I am now syncing at 5500kbps compared to 2600kbps before. This is with a 15dB noise margin which was set by BT a week ago so there is still room for further improvement.
The SNR v BIN no graph showed a dramatic improvement especially at the high frequency end.
The profile in the BT speed test showed 5000kbps but PN still shows 2000kbps which is limiting my download speed to 1960kbps.
I now have to wait for things to stabilise but I am very pleased with the results so far.
13 REPLIES
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BT Engineer's Visit

Hope you gave him a cuppa for his efforts. They work better that way.
Wink
fraval
Grafter
Posts: 91
Registered: 30-07-2007

BT Engineer's Visit

If I disconnect the bell wire on the main box which works the extensions,does this mean the phone will only ring on the main phone,and will not work on the extensions I have around the house,as I have 2 phones in the bedrooms.

Its now connected to 2 3 5 on the main box,do you mean take off the bell wire on number 3.
Thanks for any advice to this
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,983
Thanks: 8
Registered: 10-04-2007

BT Engineer's Visit

No the bell wire is a throwback to the days when phones were wired with all the bells in series.
Modern ones are all wired in parallel now and the bell wire is inefective.
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BT Engineer's Visit

We offered him a cuppa but he declined!!
fraval
Grafter
Posts: 91
Registered: 30-07-2007

BT Engineer's Visit

Thanks for that John
I will try it
Snarf
Grafter
Posts: 340
Thanks: 4
Registered: 04-08-2007

BT Engineer's Visit

I may have to ask for an engineer to visit again Sad
After a couple of weeks of good connection I've had 11 large packet loss spikes today (which usually indicate disconnects - 1 of which was forced by me to get off of the pipe being worked on). Things were looking so rosy...
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BT Engineer's Visit

Quote
No the bell wire is a throwback to the days when phones were wired with all the bells in series.
Modern ones are all wired in parallel now and the bell wire is inefective.


it's more to do with having mechanical bells. In the old days each phone had it's own bell circuit and each phone was placed in parallel across the A,B wires. So when dialing out using loop disconnect all the phones bells use to ring. Now using DTMF and phones with electronic bell circuits it now not such an issue. I also been lead to believe that the filters have a ring circuitry.
hiflier
Grafter
Posts: 45
Registered: 05-04-2007

BT Engineer's Visit

Quote

it's more to do with having mechanical bells. In the old days each phone had it's own bell circuit and each phone was placed in parallel across the A,B wires. So when dialing out using loop disconnect all the phones bells use to ring.


Not quite true.
If the extension phones "in the old days" were incorrectly wired that would be the case. However, inside the old phones, there were bridging tags that had to be removed or replaced depending on the number of extension phones were required. The old phones used a 4, or sometimes 5 wire wiring circuit to make the ringing
circuit in series while the A & B wired were in parallel.

Ian.
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BT Engineer's Visit

Yes true, removing the tags disabled the ringing circuit for that phone and and to rely on the 'master phone circuit'. So someone came up with the bright idea to remove all the ringing circuits from the phones and place them into the master socket.

Edit: All old style phones had 4 wires, which correspond to 2,5 and 3,6 on the modern boxes.
oliverb
Grafter
Posts: 606
Registered: 02-08-2007

The great bell wire conspiricy

These days most phones and modems seem to be 2-wire, I get the impression that there are still some 3-wire phones out there though and they won't ring if the bell wire is cut.

IMO if you have a NTE5 master it's simpler to just fit a faceplate filter and that takes care of all your extensions. I know it's a lot dearer than a plugin filter but at work I got a big improvement in SNR and a recurring disconnection problem vanished.

It's not too difficult to run a dedicated pair to wherever you want DSL.
fraval
Grafter
Posts: 91
Registered: 30-07-2007

BT Engineer's Visit

I removed the bell wire off my main and extenions phones
Is the noise margin better higher,thats whats happened
Here are the results
Im not PC techy at all,if someone could help with this[Many Thanks]

With Bell Wire Connected

Downstream Rate: 7616 kbps
Upstream Rate: 448 kbps
Current Noise Margin: 6.0 dB (Downstream), 19.0 db (Upstream)
Current Attenuation: 28.0 dB (Downstream), 18.0 db (Upstream)
Current Output Power: 20.2 dB (Downstream), 11.9 db (Upstream)

Without Bell Wire Connected

Downstream Rate: 7616 kbps
Upstream Rate: 448 kbps
Current Noise Margin: 11.0 dB (Downstream), 17.0 db (Upstream)
Current Attenuation: 28.0 dB (Downstream), 18.0 db (Upstream)
Current Output Power: 20.0 dB (Downstream), 11.9 db (Upstream)
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BT Engineer's Visit

Higher noise margin is a good thing and normally it would mean you would sync at a higher speed.
However, your line is so good you must be near the limit for 8Mbps.It should help in peak periods if there are any problems.I would certainly leave the bell wire disconnected.
Fred
fraval
Grafter
Posts: 91
Registered: 30-07-2007

BT Engineer's Visit

Thanks for the reply Fred