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AUP - what does it actually mean?

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AUP - what does it actually mean?

In this topic the AUP was quoted as follows:
'The use of the service to run open servers, such as SMTP relay, Web proxy and NNTP is prohibited. PlusNet define an open server being one which can be connected to over the Internet by hosts not in a trusted list.'

On the definition of 'open server' pretty much any normal server is likely to qualify: www, ftp, smtp, ntp..., so what does the bit 'such as SMTP relay...' really mean?

Hopefully, having an open ntp server is OK, but it isn't obvious to me how this can be understood from the AUP - or am I just being thick? What is the common denominator of the prohibited services?

I take the simple view that, as long as it won't cause complaints and isn't easily open to abuse, then it is acceptable Cheesy

Geoff
6 REPLIES
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AUP - what does it actually mean?

An SMTP relay is a server that will acceopt e-mail, then send it on.

These are a menace and the primary cause of major spam.

The AUP's are worded like that, so they are open to interpritation.

It is defined so that any service that is open to abuse, and likely to cause problems for other users.

Provided you are able to perform access conntol, there shoulds not be an issue.
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AUP - what does it actually mean?

My interpretation is that any server or service which allows other people to do things through your connection (such as proxys, relays, etc) are not allowed - because people could cause trouble and in the end, plusnet (well, you) would be held responsible for their actions.

Running a webserver, etc. is not because people cannot perform any actions through your adsl using that - all they do is view the pages on the server.
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AUP - what does it actually mean?

Quote

...
Provided you are able to perform access conntol, there shoulds not be an issue.


I suppose this is what I was really getting at. Normal webservers and so on do not perform access control, so it seems that open access servers are indeed acceptable unless they are amenable to abuse (open mail relays, etc.).

As you say, it has probably been made deliberately woolly...
Clarity is a better policy usually, but let's leave it at that.

Geoff
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AUP - what does it actually mean?

Most webserver do have access control by default.

Apache does for one. It provices both authentication and IP based controls.

IIS also has access control built in.
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AUP - what does it actually mean?

my webserver (KeyFocus Web Server) also lets me create groups of users with passwords, deny/permit by IP, etc etc...
jberry
Grafter
Posts: 1,886
Registered: 08-06-2007

AUP - what does it actually mean?

Hi there,

Have a look through this thread on the same subject. It explains the reasons for not making the AUP specific.

Regards,