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linksys wireless router with 4 port switch.

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linksys wireless router with 4 port switch.

http://www.linksys.com/Products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=35&prid=415

does the linksys wireless router with 4 port switch work with force 9 adsl?

cheeeers

Dennis.
4 REPLIES
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RE: linksys wireless router with 4 port switch.

> http://www.linksys.com/Products/product.asp?grid=33&scid=35&prid=415
>
> does the linksys wireless router with 4 port switch work with force 9 adsl?

Not by itself - it won't actually give you ADSL access: you need to add an ADSL router (ie a router which has a built-in ADSL modem): if you look at the product data sheet, you'll see it makes mention of a "WAN Port" - an RJ-45 connection for "a cable/DSL modem" which, for us, means an ADSL router.

But if you buy an ADSL router, it will provide you with NAT support (which is also offered by the Linksys) so you could just use a wireless access point, rather than this wireless router. You then have the ADSL router doing NAT, and connect the wireless access point into one of the ports on the back of the router. If the ADSL router has other ports, standard wired network devices can be connected.

If, however, you use this wireless router (rather than a wireless access point) and an ADSL router, you will end up with a small "perimeter network" (which might be nothing more than a piece of network cable) between the ADSL router and the wireless router, and then your own internal network will come off the wireless router. My own network is of this type, but with a standard Cable/DSL router rather than a wireless one. The ADSL modem does NAT (as before) passing the traffic on to its LAN side, which is connected (over the perimeter network) to the WAN side of the wireless router. This then does a second NAT to get the traffic on to its LAN side, which is where your PCs are connected (either by wireless or cabled network).

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RE: linksys wireless router with 4 port switch.

I've just seen a very helpful article on this subject (and it even deals with Linksys wireless products) on the adslguide website: http://www.adslguide.org.uk/hardware/reviews/2002/q3/bto-linksys.asp

If you look at their second diagram, illustrating the "Infrastructure Mode", you'll see the kind of configuration you'd end up with using the Linksys router. In their diagram, the wireless router has been split into two boxes: the green hatched "Ethernet 10/100 Switch" and the "Wireless Access Point" shown over on the right. Your Linksys Router puts both these functions into a single box.

The diagram also shows what I called the "perimeter network" in my earlier post: it's the bit of cable they've (conveniently!) coloured red in their diagram together with the network interfaces it joins - the LAN side of the "ADSL Ethernet Router" (blue hatching) and the WAN side of what they've called the "Ethernet 10/100 Switch" (green hatching). The blue cabling shows what would be your LAN, with the PCs attached (cable and/or wireless), and the black cabling ("RJ-11 cable" and "Telephone Line" depicts the WAN connection over to the Internet)

The box they've called the "Ethernet 10/100 Switch" can actually be interpreted two ways. In the way I've just described, where the red cable forms part of a "perimeter network", this device
is actually more than just a switch, since the port to which the red coloured cable is attached is NOT the same as the other ports (to which the blue coloured cables are attached). Normally these boxes are referred to as Cable/DSL Routers by the manufacturers. The Linksys Wireless Router we're discussing is, in fact, a Cable/DSL router combined with a Wireless Access Point.

The other way of interpreting the "Ethernet 10/100 Switch" is literally as a switch and no more. This then leads to the second configuration I mentioned in my earlier post, where there is no perimeter network. In this interpretation, the red cable in their diagram does not red because it's in a different network from the blue cabling, but to highlight that it's a different sort of cable from the ones used to connect PCs to the switch. (PCs to switch: straight-through cable; switch to router: EITHER cross-over cable if using a standard port on the switch, OR straight-through cable if using an "uplink" port on the switch - the uplink port does the "crossing-over" for you)
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RE: linksys wireless router with 4 port switch.

Thanks for the reply Stephen, i'll go read that article right this second!! Smiley
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RE: linksys wireless router with 4 port switch.

> Thanks for the reply Stephen, i'll go read that article right this second!! Smiley

just got the wireless router today- hopefully i can set it up easily enough- i'll let u know how i get on!