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Wireless networking

ruislip
Grafter
Posts: 44
Registered: 22-08-2007

Wireless networking

I have recently signed up for broadband with F9, having a dial up with them for two years.

We have a second PC upstairs and I would like to have this linked in in some way. Running wires is difficult but not impossible BUT I really want the connection to be independent and not to run through my PC, as this will be the one used by the kids and they tend to open e-mails with viruses attached etc !!

I have heard that once you put a wall in the way of a wireless network everything grinds to a crawl, but I was told of a system the other day that sends data over the mains supply in your own house.

Does anyone know anything about it or where one can find out more (or even buy it!!)
12 REPLIES
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Options for home networking

Hello,

Seems to me that you have three major options you could choose from here,

1) Use internet connection sharing which you've already indicated your not very keen on 2) you could network your second PC to your first PC down stairs using CAT5 cabling a hub or switch and use a router for internet access 3) you could buy a wireless router with hub (such as a 4 port hub) for ADSL web access but this requires a wirless network card in each PC. Also with wireless
you must ensure you dont have any devices locally that will cause signal interferenece and you would need to ensure that your security settings where correctly configured.

I dont know much about the problem of signal loss or data speeds being slowed down bye house walls (this may or may NOT be completely true but if you have any doubtes I would definately contact one of major ADSL router makers such as D-LINK they can give you more accurate information on this. I suspect signal loss through walls in a house is NOT completely true but more too do with distance from the web access point (from one machine to your ADSL router i.e. outbound web access point.

**I know many people who have machines upstairs and used ADSL off long cabling extensions and its always problematic as cable length does become a problem for ADSL connectivity, it tends to suffer from dropped connections frequently.

**NOT heard about networking via the mains electrical system in your house, although this may be possible I've NOT come across this and I've heard of most IT networking systems in my 10+ years in computing. It could be a new or obscure technology but its not well known to most domestic users I would say.

Best Regards Ivan
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Wireless networking

Hi,

Networking via your home electrical circuit is possible, have a look at this , altohugh its not exactly cheap at the moment!

Personally I would rather use a decent broadband adslmodem/router with wireless options such as the Netgear range.

And with regard to signal loss through walls, I recently setup a home network for my dad, 2 desktops and one laptop, the laptop and 1 desktop using wireless connections. The router was based in the cupboard under the stairs, and the wireless desktop upstairs in the back bedroom, basicall there for me to play with when I visit :lol: , it had no problems connecting and no loss of signal strength.

The laptop was able to connect with no problems from anywhere in the house, and even from inside the garden shed at the bottom of the garden, about 30 meters from the router. Interestingly when I was setting up the network and looking for the routers wireless signal I was able to see 2 other routers belonging to people in the street 2 or 3 houses away, people REALLY need to learn about wireless security beofre they install it!, I was able to connect AND surf using one of those connections, it turned out to be in a house 3 doors down from my dads, so signal loss through walls need not be a problem in most cases.

Having said that I have heard of problems caused by microwave ovens if they are on and being used, too close to either the router or the wireless pc.

Cheers
Andy
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Replying

Hello once again,

I think abellingham's reply above answers alot of the issues very nicely, I dont think signal loss isn't THAT much of an issue when it comes to wireless connectivity within the average domestic situation (perhaps it might be if you live in an old property, castle with 10feet thick walls or an old mansion house?).

Yes! wireless security is a vitally important aspect of using this technology as abellingham's reply clearly proves. When installing wireless it normally comes with whats called WEP (wireless equivalent privacy), if you just install the basic or default settings of WEP your liable to leave yourself wide open the others who might enjoy attacking your network & data. So WEP requires you to change the basic default settings so as to lock down your system/s.

Also when looking for an ADSL wireless router try and go for one that comes with a built in firewall too as this will give your network additional security. Most of the newer ADSL wireless router's now have this.

**NOTE: Wireless does have one weakness or negative it is prone to radio frequency interference from other local radio sources such as 1) passing taxi's that trasmitt & receive on a similar frequency, the police possibily too? 2) Aircraft coming to land or take off if you live under a major flight path. 3) microwave ovens I 've heard can cause problems, also mobile phones too.

**I have freinds who use wireless very successfully with few problems for home networking.

Ivan
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Wireless networking

With reference to Ivans above comments on frequency interference, yes it can be a problem, my friend had this with his cordless digital phones in his house, but most modern routers have the option to select from several channels for the wireless frequency so it shoudnt be a real problem, my Netgear DG834G for example has a choice of 13 channels.

I have several times come across people who are having wireless connectivity problems but NEVER come across a problem that couldnt be solved successfully with a little bit of thought, and believe me the less thinking I do the better Wink

Cheers
Andy
ruislip
Grafter
Posts: 44
Registered: 22-08-2007

Wireless networking

Thank you SO much for the quality of these responses, to a bit of a novice like me this level of support is.....well stunning.

As to the cost of the kit, well the link above seems to indicate it is £87 ish plus VAT, hardly a fortune given what you get....

Once again thanks
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Wireless networking

Your welcome Cheesy

If you do decide to go ahead with the electric socket plugin option let us know how it goes, I for one would be interested to hear how stable/viable this is as an alternative to the usual 'wired' network.

Cheers
Andy
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More

Hi Again,

YEP!! Seconded I'd be most interested too if you do decided on the domestic electrical plugin networking option.

Ivan Cool
ruislip
Grafter
Posts: 44
Registered: 22-08-2007

Wireless networking

Thanks, and yes I will post back here. I am now off to do some more reseach, but judging by the way the kids are moaning at me I do not think it will be long coming!!
ruislip
Grafter
Posts: 44
Registered: 22-08-2007

The final answer!

In the end I bought a D-Link DSL-G604T and it seems to work quiet well.

I did think that the instructions for it were rubbish and ended up having to get a mate in to try to help me set it up, but now it is set up it seems to work ok.
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Replying

Hi ruislip,

Seasonal greetings to you, its interesting that you bought a D-LINK product in the end. And even more interesting your comments about setup & documentation that came with it. I was a little suprised to hear this as I was recommended a D-Link DSL200 ADSL USB modem which has been fabulous and one of the best things about this product was the installation process and especially how well written the supporting product documentation is, which is what made me buy it in the end.

Anyway, glad you sound happy with what you've bought.

Best Regards for 2005 Ivan Cool
ruislip
Grafter
Posts: 44
Registered: 22-08-2007

Wireless networking

I think it all depends on where you are coming from in the first place, the book was full of jargon. I liken it to driving a car, if somebody says push down on the accelerator we all know what to do, or do we? What is an accelorator and where is it to push some might ask, but these folk are not catered for :roll: ...Huh?
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Replying

Hello Again,

OK point taken!! :-)

Ivan