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Which Telephone Socket?

N/A

Which Telephone Socket?

Can anyone confirm (or deny!) that a computer (or ADSL router) must be connected to the telephone network via the master socket. TIA.

Fred
11 REPLIES
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Which Telephone Socket?

I have a plug in extension kit which runs up my stairs into the spareroom with a socket. My adsl plugs in there and works fine.

Mark
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Which Telephone Socket?

Hello Fred,

I can definately confirm that an ADSL router (if its a wired one) definately needs to be connected to your master BT wall socket, you will need a filter also called a splitter when doing this. Its the splitter that creates the x3 seperate channels that makes up broadband (your phone line does have to be broadband enabled by the telcom's providor i.e. BT it has to be activated.).

**Some routers use a normal wired phone connection & splitter.

**Some routers are only designed to connect to a cable connection such as NTL or Telewest so its vital to check the product spec before purchase. I recently made that mistake. Fortunately the suppliers will replace the product for one that connects via BT phone lines.

**Also WiFi routers or combined wifi router/switches also use the BT socket or cable connection again check the device specifications.

Ivan
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Which Telephone Socket?

Thanks for your replies, guys.

Ivan, I'm looking at a wireless ADSL router - probably a D-Link DSL-604T as they are good value meantime, and wireless will be used as one of the PCs is sited where there are no telephone sockets. It's a standard BT telephone connection that BB is to be ordered for and the exchange shows up as having up to 2Mb BB.

I ran a test yesterday and could only achieve 49% signal strength. Speed showed as the full 54mbps and I accessed the router control screen no bother at all so can communicate with the router.

Just wondered if 49% signal strength is low enough to cause problems, eg are there any external factors that will make the signal strength vary once the system is in place?

Fred
N/A

Which Telephone Socket?

Hi Fred,

The most important thing to understand is that with ADSL the telephone line conditioning is very important to the resulting performance of the BB service. So what do I mean by that? OK there are numerous factors that impact service quality, things like distance from your nearest BT exchange i.e. the crow flies distance has an influence, line attenuation, line noise, etc.

**Line noise seems to be one of the biggest causal factors in performce problems such as dropped or disconnections or loss of the routers sync with the exchange.

**There can also be a settling down period with new ADSL phone lines as far as I can see, some new lines have initial noise problems that can be sorted out to a degree by BT engineers if you can get somene to do the required tests and tweaks to the line.

**The main problem is that when users do have problems with BT lines for there BB you cannot go directly to BT for help or support on the situation you always have to now go via your ISP and then they have to pass this on to BT which slows the whole faults process down a great deal.

Dont know if that helps or not really?

Ivan
orrery
Grafter
Posts: 138
Thanks: 1
Registered: 30-07-2007

Which Telephone Socket?

Quote
I can definately confirm that an ADSL router (if its a wired one) definately needs to be connected to your master BT wall socket


This is wrong. The router (modem/gateway) can be connected to any socket. The phone line is a pair of wires (normally) all the way back to the exchange. An extra few feet, provided the wiring is good quality, will make no difference. The only thing that the master socket does is split out a 'ring' signal on pin 3. The normal pair (on 2 and 5) are passed on to all the slave sockets.

The critical thing is that all the phones must be connected through a filter.

regards, Ian
N/A

Which Telephone Socket?

Hi Ian,

NOP!! your reply IMO Is extremely confusing, NOP! I stand by what I said before the router when you connect it up for the first time and try to configure it. It needs to be conected to the BT phone line at the BT Master socket/ wallplate, a splitter is required and is also plugged into the phone socket. Its the splitter that helps create the three ADSL channels i.e. upstream data, downstream data and finally voice data.

**Whilst you might be technically correct in terms of wiring and pin outs I think you missed the point that was being asked. I dont think that level of technical detail was required IMO.

**The point I was trying to make was that its extremely easy to be confused if your NOT told or just dont know that there are routers that are connected up to a BT phone line with a splitter and other routers that are designed for cable connections and are different in the sense that they require connecting to a cable modem for the WAN side of things i.e. to get the internet connection to work.

Ivan
orrery
Grafter
Posts: 138
Thanks: 1
Registered: 30-07-2007

Which Telephone Socket?

Quote
I stand by what I said before the router when you connect it up for the first time and try to configure it. It needs to be conected to the BT phone line at the BT Master socket/ wallplate...


There is no physical difference between the signals present on the master or the slave sockets. Full stop.

Quote
... a splitter is required and is also plugged into the phone socket. Its the splitter that helps create the three ADSL channels i.e. upstream data, downstream data and finally voice data.


No splitter is needed. A microfilter is needed to block the low-impedence path that would be provided by a telephone and would attenuate the ADSL signals. Thus the critical factor is making sure that every phone is connected through a microfilter.

I'm sorry if this is over complicated - I'm not meaning it to be, neither am I trying to start an argument. However, the original enquiry was clear - does the ADSL device need to be connected at the master socket and the answer is emphatically, no.

regards, Ian
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Which Telephone Socket?

i've got to agree it doesn't matter which socket you have your adsl equipment plugged into, ideally yes it should be the master socket, and prefably one with a dual faceplate thats combines both phone/adsl points so no need for filters.

as for the dlink dslg604-t only giving about 49% signal strength that is poor, i'm always near 100% signal, remember place antenna horizontally and not vertically, also you can boost the range and power within the configuration screens.
francoise-hardy
Grafter
Posts: 94
Registered: 30-07-2007

Which Telephone Socket?

MY twopennorth for what it's worth. I also would agree that you can connect your adsl either to the master socket (which by definition is the entrance/boundary of your premises) or to a correctly installed extension. If an extension works ok with adsl, then great. BUT, beware, the more connections/cables you have, the greater the chance of mishap, resulting in poor/faulty connection. That is why bt/f9 usually ask for any test from a connection directly into the backplate of master socket, so as to eliminate any chance of faults/problems elsewhere. Whatever you choose, make sure a serviceable splitter/filter is installed correctly.
robinh
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Which Telephone Socket?

Thanks for all the replies and thank goodness for discussion forums!

Re the poor signal strength on the DSL-604T, it has to go through two thick granite walls about 12 metres apart.

I'm interested in your statement about placing the aerial horizontally. Didn't try that.

Once again, my thanks.

Fred
orrery
Grafter
Posts: 138
Thanks: 1
Registered: 30-07-2007

Which Telephone Socket?

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I'm interested in your statement about placing the aerial horizontally


This can become quite specific with where the access point and laptop are located. If the aerial is vertical then it radiates equally out in all directions horizintally - you get no coverage off the end of the aerial (vertically up or down). Similarly, if you place the aerial horizontally then you have no coverage off the ends of the aerial.

If your laptop card is anything like the norm, then the aerial will be horizontal along the exposed end of the card. The optimum is to have both antenna parallel.

It gets tricky if you have several WiFi devices and more than one access point. If coverage is a real issue, you may need to get one of the newer MIMO WiFi access points which utilise one of the features (rake filters) of CDMA technology to improve coverage.

regards, Ian