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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

As above, Why is it britain is always behind in regards with this sort of thing? We pay more and get less. I've heard stories about people in germany with 36meg pipes etc etc
9 REPLIES
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Are You sure?

Hi,
Well I wasnt aware that we are still in the stone age when it comes to ADSL and Broadband services & internet use here in the UK. Are you so completely certain of your facts (germanys having 36megs?? Hum!! what telechnology are you specifically talking about here??).

Frankly after having waited more than two years to have BT & F9 give me ADSL 512K I'm delighted with what I have and its extremely good quality as far as my experience goes. Also if you look directly at what the Korenians to with there multiple megabit broadband domestic service then its shown they play more games, view movies online, or download more porn,etc,etc. So I personally dont thinnk more IS better (size isnt everying as alot of people like to think!).

Think about it even if you had 100's of megabits to play with what would you do with it??

Ivan :lol:
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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

Well, the simple fact is, if you look at the specification of your ADSL modem or router, you'll see the top speed it can manage is something like 8Mbps download, and probably no more than 1Mbps (or less) upload.

So, are these modems/routers made only for the British market, with its "slow" speeds? I think the answer is "no" -- essentially the same modems/routers are sold all over the world; so it follows, wherever you go, if they're using ADSL technology, they can't be getting more than 8Mbps download and less than 1Mbps upload speeds. Still, possibly more than the 2Mbps/256kbps here, but by no means in the 36Mbps league. If they're not using ADSL (or possibly xDSL) that may be a different story, though.

So, I suspect it could be a case of the grass always being greener on the other side of the fence. Or of, if you happen to live in some small privileged area in central Berlin somewhere, where a special network has been set up, then it is possible to get exceptional speeds.

I vaguely recall hearing recently that Nokia's research division had announced some new technology that would revolutionise speeds -- I think they were talking of mid-20s MBps, but as far as I'm aware it's not on the market yet.
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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

IIRC there are some places with more than 8MB download speeds, but I can't think where, off-hand, but I've certianly never heard of 36MB - the most is usually in the region of 10.
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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

Actually, come to think of it, in Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) doesn't a single DVB-S (Satellite) transponder provide a 36Mbps datastream (using normal modulation, QPSK, or whatever it's called)? So, perhaps that's what's being used. But, surely, that capacity would be divided-up between loads of users, so the bandwidth available to a single user would be rather less than this.

And uploading to a satellite is normally a bit difficult for home users, so it probably relies on telephone technology for uploading (just as satellite TV broadcasters do for the "return path" on their set top boxes).

I know the British Government plans to use DVB technologies to bring local and national government services into (almost) every home in the UK, reasoning that something like 97% of people have at least one TV in their homes, whereas (if I remember correctly) only 50% have a PC, and that, once analogue TV is switched off, all TV users will have access to the DVB technology of one sort or another (be it cable, satellite or terrestrial) on which it relies. In effect, this is equivalent to bringing the Internet to everyone, albeit only as far as Government content is concerned, although other suppliers may jump in to provide a wider range of content.

So, the simple fact is that loads of people (over half the population) already have very cheap access to much faster data pipes than ADSL ones, but they're used for broadcasting, not unicasting.
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A Case in point!!

Hi,
Here's a copy of an article shown in the Guardians Oline this week, a good case in point??

Thursday July 8, 2004
The Guardian

Price difference
"BT hammers prices in broadband battle" (Guardian, June 30). Surely "BT continues to keep prices artificially high" would be more apt. With few exceptions, when you buy an ADSL product in Britain, it is a resold BT package. In France, we have Local Loop Unbundling. For €30 a month, I have a 5Mbps connection from Free that also delivers about 100 TV channels and free telephone calls. Were I on a budget, I could choose instead a 1024kbps connection from Alice for €11. I make that less than £8.
Andy Cook

Ivan :lol:
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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

Unfortunately, that correspondent's letter does give a misleading impression, with its "In France, we have Local Loop Unbundling..." as if we don't have it in the UK (it's an EU requirement).

I suspect it may not be valid to do a straight comparison of costs between what we pay for our service and what the French pay for theirs, because there may be hidden costs the subscriber may not be aware of. For example, BT was privatised years ago; there's no state money to prop up our telecomms industry: what we pay is the price for the service. France Telecomm is still a state-owned company, with huge debts, so when the subscriber sees a bill of €30 to a service provider, that may just be the tip of the mountain, and underneath it there's a huge hidden cost in the form of state involvement, which every tax payer is contributing to, whether they have the service or not.
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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

I have a friend in sweden who has a 10mb down and 2mb up and pays £8.50. He has has that for two years Cry
fraserc
Grafter
Posts: 38
Registered: 06-04-2007

When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

Same story. I also have a friend in Sweden. He recently moved into a new apartment. The builders had just completed 5 apartment blocks and had a 3GB feed through their own routers, providing 10Mb to each apartment. Each room has a 'datapoint' panel providing 'phone, data, cable and terrestrial TV.

Total cost for the feed? 40GBP for connection, all other charges covered by the standard management costs for the apartment.

On the down side 'tho - how much help is vastly greater speed? Fine, it's good for most downloads but I often see that the delays at the remote end while page requests are serviced mean that browsing is relatively slow, especially if the content is dynamic. A good example is F9. I'm not complaining at all, but the page delays, especially when reading mail, are quite noticeable. We can't expect every provider of any web service to provide near-infinite computer power so this will limit the experience for as long as I can foresee.
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When will we be on par with the rest of europe, speed wise?

If anyone here has watched the Information channel on Sky Digital (its a relatively new public information channel, not the Sky information one) they had a programme on about broadband britain.

Basically they were discussing how to get faster pipes into peoples homes as we are different from other countries in various ways so the methods they used do not exactly apply.

The eventual point being that until we obsolutely need the bandwidth who is going to bother spending the vast amount of money to improve the telecommunications network to provide it? In other words watching TV via the Internet, etc.

Also my understanding of other countries is their broadband might be cheap but they have bandwidth quotas like ISPs over here are starting to have. Not all are as good as F9 in offering an unlimited bandwidth package so it could be quite expensive. Its all about cost as ADSL gets stuck at around 2Mbit on BTs current network so who is going to spend money on upgrading all that when there are still some exchanges without ADSL? Interestingly Cable may potentially be able to go as high as they want, I suspect Telewest could easily cope with 10Mbit+ speeds however from what I have seen their actual ISP portion can barely cope with what they have now so there wouldnt be any point.

For example:
On 512k last month I managed approx 75GB of data transfer without even trying (assuming the View My Usage was correct which I suspect it was) and thats VASTLY higher than any quota I have heard of. Even on a normal surfing day (no downloading game demos, trailers etc) I manage about 500MB and I just upgraded to 1Mbit so I expect all these values to rise a little as downloading larger and trying more different Linux distros etc will be more appealing. In fact even BTs 1Mbit package wouldnt be enough for the transfer I was doing on 512k and I seem to recall the European ISPs I heard about having lower quotas than BT.