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This is the latest craze - apparently!

chrisco
Grafter
Posts: 314
Registered: 31-07-2007

This is the latest craze - apparently!

Anyone seen this, looks like fun! Cheesy

cola and mentos experiment!
10 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,656
Registered: 13-06-2007

This is the latest craze - apparently!

Its been around for years, I saw an article about it in the Metro (the free paper you get on buses and trains!)

I saw loads of kids doing it in the park today its great fun the hard part is getting the entire tube in the bottle and running away quick!
chrisco
Grafter
Posts: 314
Registered: 31-07-2007

This is the latest craze - apparently!

I can remember using just sugar as a kid & I'm..............well never mind, (don't say I must have a good memory!!) Looks good fun, wouldn't fancy having to wash off loads of sticky fizz from my hair though.
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This is the latest craze - apparently!

As a wee nipper, I remember dropping mint imperials into peoples pop cans on school trips etc. - A similar, if less dramatic effect.
Nasty old me eh. Wink
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Re: This is the latest craze - apparently!

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Anyone seen this, looks like fun! Cheesy

cola and mentos experiment!
How exactly does it work? and is it safe?
chrisco
Grafter
Posts: 314
Registered: 31-07-2007

This is the latest craze - apparently!

This is the scientifc explanation, safe? you wouldn't obviously want to stand over the bottle as it went up!

SODA FOUNTAIN
This experiment shows gases being released. It should be done outside.
WHAT YOU NEED
1 packet of Mentos A two-litre bottle of diet fizzy drink Plastic box
WHAT TO DO
Put an open bottle of fizzy drink in a plastic container. Unwrap the packet of Mentos and put the sweets in a paper tube. Put the tube into the bottle and pour all the sweets in together. Stand back!
THE SCIENCE
Carbon dioxide is pumped into fizzy drinks at the bottling factory, using lots of pressure. Water molecules, which are strongly attracted to each other, cling together, surrounding the tiny bubbles of gas.
Because the surface tension is so strong, most of the gas stays suspended in the liquid, and cannot expand to form more bubbles. Mentos contain an ingredient called Gum Arabic, whose proteins cause the surface tension of the water molecules to break, releasing the carbon dioxide gas.
As well as this, as the sweets dissolve, tiny pits form on their surface allowing carbon dioxide bubbles to form. As the gas is released so quickly, it takes a lot of the liquid with it.
All experiments should be carried out under the supervision of adults.
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Mentos

Yes I see the scientific explanation OK, however I still don't know what Mentos is.
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This is the latest craze - apparently!

They are sweeties... Smiley

Linky
shellsong
Grafter
Posts: 2,191
Registered: 03-08-2007

This is the latest craze - apparently!

Seems a bit more harmless fun than the old "asprins in Coke" when Coke had coca plant derivatives in it-- allegedly the asprin enabled youngsters to get a bit of a cocaine high out of it! :roll:

(Mind you Coke's pretty evil anyway-- when my son was in Junior School they carried out an experiment with old milk teeth in Coke that showed how the teeth dissolved in short order!)
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This is the latest craze - apparently!

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Mind you Coke's pretty evil anyway...


It's good for cleaning old coins. Wink
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This is the latest craze - apparently!

Heard an urban myth once - US State Troopers carry Coke (Soft drink - before the lawyers get onto me Wink ) bottles around in their cars to clear up blood etc following accidents.
Like I say, I reckon its a myth, but you can follow the logic process to agree it would work...