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Take a Router over USB anyday!

jfrank
Grafter
Posts: 61
Registered: 30-07-2007

Take a Router over USB anyday!

I bought a US Robotics USB modem for DSL. I had lots of disconnections. I don't think it is the Modem, more my PC's USB functionality. If you have had lots of unexplained drops then give a Router a try. If you have not decided yet, I would definately go for the Router. I got a Solwise SAR130 (about £50) and it rocks, been connected since I bought it, no problems. It was a doddle to install too, I mean really easy! Easier than trying to install the USB modem.

So if you're just getting into the idea of broadband, I would go for a Router, it's a much better way to connect.

And if you got connection troubles, try out a Router!
11 REPLIES
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USB Modem verses Router

Hi,
Whilst I agree routers are very good for ADSL connections I would say that it does depend alot on what your using it for. Fine for home or office networks but not everyone wants or needs that level of sophistication or complexity.

My USB ADSL Modem has been totally fantastic rock solid since purchased it & I have had no problems with dropped connections and my normal uptime is usually around a month. sometimes more & the only problems are with stale sessions but this can also happen with routers.

**My device is a D-Link DSL 200 USB ADSL Modem.

Ivan
jfrank
Grafter
Posts: 61
Registered: 30-07-2007

Take a Router over USB anyday!

I agree the USB for ADSL does work perfectly well on most systems, but I know of at least 3 people who have suffered disconnections via the USB route because of Motherboards or other configs.

My only real point was to say if you are having disconnections, and you tried everything else, try using something other than USB.

Cheers,
J.
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Zoom USB solves intermittent loss of sync

Cheesy Although Routers are a good option I have a USB Zoom modem and have no problems at all. Previously had many problems with loss of sync whilst using F9 supplied Dynamode PCI modem (tried 3 - all sucked!)

I was beginning to think it was my PC but not anymore. I would happily recommend the Zoom USB modem to anyone who does not want / need to have a router.

Darren
jfrank
Grafter
Posts: 61
Registered: 30-07-2007

Zooom, I nearly bought one!

I nearly bought a Zoom, but bought the US robotics coz of the brand name. I also tried a F9 supplied Binatone which would not install on my W2K system (something to do with Active X?)
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Take a Router over USB anyday!

Just an aside really to this discussion - the comment about USB not talking to motherboards. This seems to be a not uncommon problem if your PC is anything over a couple of years old. There are a number of common slightly older chipsets about that can't handle current USB products. I got stuffed recently when I upgraded my printer to a USB all-in-one and got nowhere - only had to spend more than the printer cost to get my PC upgraded... Doh! Certainly not something for which you can blame F9 , though...
jfrank
Grafter
Posts: 61
Registered: 30-07-2007

Motherboards and USB

Yep, I had the same problems. My USB printer still uninstalls itself sometimes and the hub I fitted crashed the PC if you add a USB modem to it (!?). It was also the cause of all my line drops/sync problems...

For the record my chipset is VIA (support did mention VIA might be an issue).
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Take a Router over USB anyday!

I think mine was a VIA something or other... but it affected SiS and Intel ones as well, something obscure at the USB Universal Host Controller level - I didn't even know I had one of those until I read the support pages and looked up the hardware in Control Panel... and bingo! mine was one of those listed as "potentially" a problem...

One other thought that occurs to me about your hub - unless it's powered, it only has the juice it can get from the PC, usually about 500 ma. If your modem needs anything like that to run and you have another device plugged in, that can drop your line...
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Take a Router over USB anyday!

Another plus to routers over modems that nobody mentioned here, and its a biggie, security.

Often people claim routers are less secure and potentially on a network they could be (an always open door to any PCs turned on) but setup correctly a hacker is unlikely to get far, especially compared to a modem running under Windows.

Most routers do NAT and thar more-or-less firewalls you even if your router doesnt claim to have its own firewall (any requests coming in from the internet hit the router and have nowhere further to go). As routers vary and as dedicated to a specific task they are less prone to being hacked, and can do less damage if they are, than a Windows PC. Remember even if a Windows PC is firewalled there might even be a bug in the firewall that could let someone in as its still a software solution on top of Windows. A router however is dedicated to the task and as far as im aware immune to viruses as the different CPUs used in routers vary so much nobody bothers to write them.

The only thing that can NEVER be protected from is user stupidity. I once got infected with a trojan because I stupidly clicked on an e-mail attachment. Trojans often can do damage where an outside attack could not as so long as the request is coming from inside your firewall then it can get back outside and request instructions from a hackers PC.

Overall, I have seen a lot of ping floods and other attacks logged in my router but it never touches the network as none of the PCs are part of the Internet itself, only the router has a public IP. Had it been via a modem on the PC it might have been a different story as then the PC itself has the public IP and becomes part of the Internet itself.
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Replying to Routers verses USB modems for BB

Hello,

I read the above thread and agree with most of what you've said but the point I would also make in addition to your comments. Is that some routers are quite complex and require quite detailed configuration in order to provide the best levels of security. (Even routers can be mis-configured and thus allow certain ports to be potentially left vulnerable to attack or penetration) i.e. to be locked down correctly. (I'm talking in general terms here not about specific routers or products).

Yes! its true that many of the newer ADSL routers are very much improved in specifications like inclusion of NAT's and firewalling,etc but this does add complexity though. NOT everyone is upto installing and configuring their own router for ADSL so this is perhaps were ADSL modems have a place in the scheme of things.

**The arguement about which is better hardware firewalls or software firewalls will run and run, there are those people who will argue until the cows come home for one or the other.

**My own experience is with the free version of the excellent ZoneAlarm in one of its very early release's. This is a rock solid software firewall that has never let me down in about two hand a half years of 24/7 continous use. Security tests of this product show stealth mode working well with no ports left vulnerable.

Ivan Cool
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Take a Router over USB anyday!

Quote
...The only thing that can NEVER be protected from is user stupidity. I once got infected with a trojan because I stupidly clicked on an e-mail attachment....

No matter how long you've used a computer, it is all too easy, you're busy, have loads of e-mail to check and expect a holiday photo from uncle Bob and 'hey presto!' a porn dialler installs itself Evil Thank God for anti-virus (or uncle-virus should you be a PC PC user) and Ad-Aware Smiley

But any ADSL is a bonus here too since you don't (and can't) dial a phone number on ADSL they fail to connect and you get a warning message pop up on screen alerting you the dial-out failed (in case you didn't spot the hidden installation). Cheesy To thieves everywhere (trojan writers are, after all, trying to steal from you) we say Tongue
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Take a Router over USB anyday!

Actually I don't think routers are much harder (if any harder at all) than setting up a modem.

The reason setting up a modem seems easier is because people do not generally think about security when setting up a modem, its left wide open for everyone to hack their way in.

Some routers also are wide open by default but its more obvious as you can see all the options at a glance whereas Windows tends to hide things or not even have certain options at all. For example I wouldnt have a clue how to set up port forwarding on Windows but its a piece of cake on a router and not rocket science on Linux for that matter.

One thing to watch out for when setting up a new router: check if it has options to ftp new firmware directly and remote access. These two options are the most likely way for someone to screw around with your router from the Internet.