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TV Out

cannylad
Grafter
Posts: 98
Registered: 07-08-2007

TV Out

Hi,
can anyone offer me advice on what I need to transfer video and sound from my computer directly to a VCR. I have been told its expensive, however I see some cheap graphic cards have video out, could I use one of them or do I have to buy something more expensive...any ideas what I should buy.
Thanks
Eric
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13 REPLIES
N/A

RE: TV Out, REPLY

> Hi,
> can anyone offer me advice on what I need to transfer video and sound from my computer directly to a VCR. I have been told its expensive, however I see some cheap graphic cards have video out, could I use one of them or do I have to buy something more expensive...any ideas what I should buy.
> Thanks
> Eric
>
> --
>

Hi Eric,
OK my first question here would be to ask you why you want to do this ?(transfer video & sound from a computer).

1)Graphics cards (mainly the newer or more recent cards)that have TV out means that you can output your computer desktop image onto a TV screen and display the desktop as you would use it on your normal monitor (I guess for presentation purposes such as in business, like powerpoint etc).

2)Out putting Video & Sound requires that you have the right cable types & also the correct signal output from PC to TV.

3)your TV must have a socket or connector that will accept the signal from your PC/computer.

4)I think there are two major signal types one european standard & I think the second is a US standard signal type for this purpose. I cannot remember there names now but might be able to search them out for you.

5)I dont think you'll get terribly good quality of image resolution (sharpness)even if you can get this to work. You might end up spending alot of moeny & time and the results might be very disappointing. Image & output quality must be considered very carefully before you spend any serious money on such a project. You might find that there are far better routes to achieving what you want.

Best Regards
Ivan


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cannylad
Grafter
Posts: 98
Registered: 07-08-2007

RE: TV Out, REPLY

Hi Ivan,
Thanks for your reply.
The reason I want to do this is because I have some video footage on my computer and want to download it to tape so my friend can watch it who doesn't have a DVD player.
I suppose I could carry on doing what I have benn and that is copying it to CD in DVD fomat and then to tape, just seems the long way round and I thought it would be easy.
I thought buying a cheap graphics card with video out would be the answer but wasn't sure, someone said I need to buy a TV card for my comp but thats about £60.

Anyway thanks for your reply and Merry Christmas.

Eric
> > Hi,
> > can anyone offer me advice on what I need to transfer video and sound from my computer directly to a VCR. I have been told its expensive, however I see some cheap graphic cards have video out, could I use one of them or do I have to buy something more expensive...any ideas what I should buy.
> > Thanks
> > Eric
> >
> > --
> >
>
> Hi Eric,
> OK my first question here would be to ask you why you want to do this ?(transfer video & sound from a computer).
>
> 1)Graphics cards (mainly the newer or more recent cards)that have TV out means that you can output your computer desktop image onto a TV screen and display the desktop as you would use it on your normal monitor (I guess for presentation purposes such as in business, like powerpoint etc).
>
> 2)Out putting Video & Sound requires that you have the right cable types & also the correct signal output from PC to TV.
>
> 3)your TV must have a socket or connector that will accept the signal from your PC/computer.
>
> 4)I think there are two major signal types one european standard & I think the second is a US standard signal type for this purpose. I cannot remember there names now but might be able to search them out for you.
>
> 5)I dont think you'll get terribly good quality of image resolution (sharpness)even if you can get this to work. You might end up spending alot of moeny & time and the results might be very disappointing. Image & output quality must be considered very carefully before you spend any serious money on such a project. You might find that there are far better routes to achieving what you want.
>
> Best Regards
> Ivan
>
>
>
> --
>


--
N/A

RE: TV Out, REPLY

Basically any graphics card with a TV out is usable, as long as you've got a scart connector or component connectors (i.e. the yellow video, red and white stereo feed). I've got an ATI Radeon 7500 which has a TV-Out, I just connect the adapter, then feed the video component into the TV/VCR alongwith the output of the sound card via a minijack to two phono lead.

I've used a laptop with a video out before to record to tape and the quality was OK (you have to remember that VCR quality is something low like 250 vertical lines) opposed to that of the PC which is about 480 minimum (when set to 640*480).

Just check out what sort of outputs the card you want has and if you have matching inputs on your VCR. The only thing wrong with the ATI TV out (unless you go for the more expensive ones with breakout boxes) is that I've never been able to get the component to scart converter they provide to work (I have a feeling it's one way converting a SCART signal to components as opposed to the other which would be useful).
N/A

RE: TV Out, FURTHER REPLY

> Hi Ivan,
> Thanks for your reply.
> The reason I want to do this is because I have some video footage on my computer and want to download it to tape so my friend can watch it who doesn't have a DVD player.
> I suppose I could carry on doing what I have benn and that is copying it to CD in DVD fomat and then to tape, just seems the long way round and I thought it would be easy.
> I thought buying a cheap graphics card with video out would be the answer but wasn't sure, someone said I need to buy a TV card for my comp but thats about £60.
>
> Anyway thanks for your reply and Merry Christmas.
>
> Eric
> > > Hi,
> > > can anyone offer me advice on what I need to transfer video and sound from my computer directly to a VCR. I have been told its expensive, however I see some cheap graphic cards have video out, could I use one of them or do I have to buy something more expensive...any ideas what I should buy.
> > > Thanks
> > > Eric
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> >
> > Hi Eric,
> > OK my first question here would be to ask you why you want to do this ?(transfer video & sound from a computer).
> >
> > 1)Graphics cards (mainly the newer or more recent cards)that have TV out means that you can output your computer desktop image onto a TV screen and display the desktop as you would use it on your normal monitor (I guess for presentation purposes such as in business, like powerpoint etc).
> >
> > 2)Out putting Video & Sound requires that you have the right cable types & also the correct signal output from PC to TV.
> >
> > 3)your TV must have a socket or connector that will accept the signal from your PC/computer.
> >
> > 4)I think there are two major signal types one european standard & I think the second is a US standard signal type for this purpose. I cannot remember there names now but might be able to search them out for you.
> >
> > 5)I dont think you'll get terribly good quality of image resolution (sharpness)even if you can get this to work. You might end up spending alot of moeny & time and the results might be very disappointing. Image & output quality must be considered very carefully before you spend any serious money on such a project. You might find that there are far better routes to achieving what you want.
> >
> > Best Regards
> > Ivan
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> >
>
>
>
> --
>
Hi Eric,
I did another web search for you on this subject:-

1)the three signal standards used for PC to TV output are as follows:NTSC, PAL and SCART.

2)All the products used for PC to TV conversion are pretty expensive and good cards start at around the £100 area.

3)example of the above are:-
http://www.dvdirect.com/shop/product.asp?sku=FCS5006

Hope this might be of use.Best Wishes
Ivan


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N/A

RE: TV Out, FURTHER REPLY

> 1)the three signal standards used for PC to TV output are as follows:NTSC, PAL and SCART.

Actually thats incorrect, NTSC and the various PAL flavours are the way the picture is encoded, i.e. Region 1 DVDs are NTSC, Region 2 PAL etc, you also get SECAM in France (for VHS at least) I think. SCART is actually a type of connector for transmitting the signal, as opposed to standard coax, i.e. analogue aerial to back of TV, or component feeds (RGB), or the separate video, audio cables, or S-Video. SCART is not a signal encoding scheme, it is a transport for the signal.

And as I said before a standard card with a TV-Out on is fine
N/A

RE: TV Out, Reply Again

> > 1)the three signal standards used for PC to TV output are as follows:NTSC, PAL and SCART.
>
> Actually thats incorrect, NTSC and the various PAL flavours are the way the picture is encoded, i.e. Region 1 DVDs are NTSC, Region 2 PAL etc, you also get SECAM in France (for VHS at least) I think. SCART is actually a type of connector for transmitting the signal, as opposed to standard coax, i.e. analogue aerial to back of TV, or component feeds (RGB), or the separate video, audio cables, or S-Video. SCART is not a signal encoding scheme, it is a transport for the signal.
>
> And as I said before a standard card with a TV-Out on is fine

Hi,
OK I stand corrected THANK YOU!!, so its not a signal standard but a type of encoding used. I think AL that for alot of people getting to grips with what is a standard, what is an encoding method and what connectors to use (especially if you've never done any of this stuff before)can get a tad confusing.

AL whats the difference between a signal encoding scheme and a signal transport? becuase I doubte most people would know!!.

Ivan


--
N/A

RE: TV Out, Some Futher Info

> Hi Ivan,
> Thanks for your reply.
> The reason I want to do this is because I have some video footage on my computer and want to download it to tape so my friend can watch it who doesn't have a DVD player.
> I suppose I could carry on doing what I have benn and that is copying it to CD in DVD fomat and then to tape, just seems the long way round and I thought it would be easy.
> I thought buying a cheap graphics card with video out would be the answer but wasn't sure, someone said I need to buy a TV card for my comp but thats about £60.
>
> Anyway thanks for your reply and Merry Christmas.
>
> Eric
> > > Hi,
> > > can anyone offer me advice on what I need to transfer video and sound from my computer directly to a VCR. I have been told its expensive, however I see some cheap graphic cards have video out, could I use one of them or do I have to buy something more expensive...any ideas what I should buy.
> > > Thanks
> > > Eric
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> >
> > Hi Eric,
> > OK my first question here would be to ask you why you want to do this ?(transfer video & sound from a computer).
> >
> > 1)Graphics cards (mainly the newer or more recent cards)that have TV out means that you can output your computer desktop image onto a TV screen and display the desktop as you would use it on your normal monitor (I guess for presentation purposes such as in business, like powerpoint etc).
> >
> > 2)Out putting Video & Sound requires that you have the right cable types & also the correct signal output from PC to TV.
> >
> > 3)your TV must have a socket or connector that will accept the signal from your PC/computer.
> >
> > 4)I think there are two major signal types one european standard & I think the second is a US standard signal type for this purpose. I cannot remember there names now but might be able to search them out for you.
> >
> > 5)I dont think you'll get terribly good quality of image resolution (sharpness)even if you can get this to work. You might end up spending alot of moeny & time and the results might be very disappointing. Image & output quality must be considered very carefully before you spend any serious money on such a project. You might find that there are far better routes to achieving what you want.
> >
> > Best Regards
> > Ivan
> >

Hi,
here is a link that might be useful for you:
http://www.disctronics.co.uk/technology/dvdvideo/dvdvid_videnc.htm

Ivan

--
N/A

RE: TV Out, Reply Again

> Hi,
> OK I stand corrected THANK YOU!!, so its not a signal standard but a type of encoding used. I think AL that for alot of people getting to grips with what is a standard, what is an encoding method and what connectors to use (especially if you've never done any of this stuff before)can get a tad confusing.
>
> AL whats the difference between a signal encoding scheme and a signal transport? becuase I doubte most people would know!!.
>
> Ivan

Right then NTSC and PAL are signal encoding schemes which basically determine what is sent over the wire. Although these days (and I'm talking the last 5 years or so), most TVs in the UK support both PAL and NTSC.

What I meant by transport was the way the signal is sent from the PC/Video/DVD/AV Amp/etc/etc to the TV. This could be standard co-ax, separate video and audio, component video (RGB), SCART, etc.

However I think this topic has digressed excessively from the original subject. In my original reply I stated that if you buy a graphics card with tv-out in this country it will suffice for recording to video. My last reply was just to correct the error you made in your reply to mine. Any graphics card you buy in this country will output a PAL signal, so theres no need to go into NTSC etc.

So to clarify my original reply, check what connectors you've got on your VCR, you should have at least a SCART connector and then check what various cards with TV-outs supply, even if they only provide an s-video or separates output, you should still be able to get a converter from your local electronics or AV store.

If you want any other information on these sort of subjects I'd recommend visiting an AV website such as that of Home Cinema Choice. Although I don't know what the address is off hand, my old man visits there a lot and he is a real home cinema buff.
N/A

RE: TV Out, More Reply Again

> > Hi,
> > OK I stand corrected THANK YOU!!, so its not a signal standard but a type of encoding used. I think AL that for alot of people getting to grips with what is a standard, what is an encoding method and what connectors to use (especially if you've never done any of this stuff before)can get a tad confusing.
> >
> > AL whats the difference between a signal encoding scheme and a signal transport? becuase I doubte most people would know!!.
> >
> > Ivan
>
> Right then NTSC and PAL are signal encoding schemes which basically determine what is sent over the wire. Although these days (and I'm talking the last 5 years or so), most TVs in the UK support both PAL and NTSC.
>
> What I meant by transport was the way the signal is sent from the PC/Video/DVD/AV Amp/etc/etc to the TV. This could be standard co-ax, separate video and audio, component video (RGB), SCART, etc.
>
> However I think this topic has digressed excessively from the original subject. In my original reply I stated that if you buy a graphics card with tv-out in this country it will suffice for recording to video. My last reply was just to correct the error you made in your reply to mine. Any graphics card you buy in this country will output a PAL signal, so theres no need to go into NTSC etc.
>
> So to clarify my original reply, check what connectors you've got on your VCR, you should have at least a SCART connector and then check what various cards with TV-outs supply, even if they only provide an s-video or separates output, you should still be able to get a converter from your local electronics or AV store.
>
> If you want any other information on these sort of subjects I'd recommend visiting an AV website such as that of Home Cinema Choice. Although I don't know what the address is off hand, my old man visits there a lot and he is a real home cinema buff.

Hi,
Thanks for an informative reply. Yes!I understand about the graphics card side of outputting a signal better from what you've been saying here. Perhaps you might be able to answer another related question in this subject area, I keep hearing alot of talk about break-out boxes and was wondering why this was needed or used in video/audio editing systems do you have any idea about this?

Cheers Ivan

--
N/A

RE: TV Out, More Reply Again

> Hi,
> Thanks for an informative reply. Yes!I understand about the graphics card side of outputting a signal better from what you've been saying here. Perhaps you might be able to answer another related question in this subject area, I keep hearing alot of talk about break-out boxes and was wondering why this was needed or used in video/audio editing systems do you have any idea about this?
>
> Cheers Ivan

Basically break out boxes are used for the most part with video editing cards such as those offered by Matrox (can't remember the model numbers off hand). These allow you to input via a multitude of mediums for capturing video or outputting it to other mediums for distribution.

However the term break out box isn't solely limited to video editing. You can also get audio break outs. Basically, it comes down to the fact that there's limited space for connectors on the back on a PC expansion card and it's also fiddly to go round the back everytime you want to change an input/output. So when manufacturers require loads of i/o's on their cards they provide a break out box that connects to a proprietary connector on the back of the card to allow the multitude of options to be provided via an external box.

But as I say you only tend to see these with high end graphics cards (some ASUS ones I think) and the expensive video editing cards.
N/A

RE: TV Out, FURTHER REPLY

>Actually thats incorrect, NTSC and the various PAL flavours are the way the picture is encoded, i.e. Region 1 DVDs are NTSC, Region 2 PAL etc, you also get SECAM in France (for VHS at least) I think.

Is this itself a bit misleading? As you say, NTSC, PAL and SECAM are encodings, but they're all analogue ones. DVD uses a different encoding, basically MPEG-2 (although the sound may be PCM, DD, DTS, or MPEG - all DVD Video players must be PCM and DD capable, and European ones must also be MPEG capable), all packaged in an MPEG-2 "container". These are digital encodings and are not NTSC, PAL, or SECAM. The NTSC or PAL/SECAM bit comes into play for DVD not because DVD uses those encodings, but because of the requirements of the target display device; in NTSC areas (Region 1 DVD discs) the MPEG encoding is for a frame size of 720x480 at 29.97 frames a second interlaced (60 fields per second). The 480 corresponds to a 525 line display device, on which some lines are off-screen and not visible. For PAL areas, its a frame size of 720x576 with 25 frames per second, interlaced (ie 50 fields per second). The 576 corresponds to a 625 line display device, again some of the lines are off screen, so don't need to be encoded.
N/A

RE: TV Out, REPLY

> I've used a laptop with a video out before to record to tape and the quality was OK (you have to remember that VCR quality is something low like 250 vertical lines) opposed to that of the PC which is about 480 minimum (when set to 640*480).

I'm not sure its correct to compare TV and PC-monitor picture quality in this way, for they use different techniques, the TV screen being interlaced, and the PC monitor progressive scan. The 250 lines you talk of for VHS are, as you say *vertical*, so measuring between the lines is a *horizontal* measurement, thus giving the horizontal resolution of the picture. As you know, TV here uses a 625-line system, but because some of them are not in the part of the screen which is visible, the vertical resolution is somewhat less than this.
N/A

RE: TV Out

> Hi,
> can anyone offer me advice on what I need to transfer video and sound from my computer directly to a VCR. I have been told its expensive, however I see some cheap graphic cards have video out, could I use one of them or do I have to buy something more expensive...any ideas what I should buy.
> Thanks
> Eric
>
> --
>

Hi..
I see no-one has mention another perhaps better option. If you have the abilty to encode your own DVD content, but don't want the bother of writing DVD discs. This can be done without a DVDR. Then why not use the £40-50 DVD decoder cards such as the Hollywood Magic or Creative DXR series DVD decoders. You will find a wealth of information on the subject of video at this website. You never know your aspirations may run higher than simple video transfer.
http://www.digital-digest.com/
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Coffee..
Great, milk and sugar please ;-)