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Problems sending email

Galileo
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 31-07-2007

Problems sending email

I have a dsl account and cannot send email from Outlook to aol addresses or pipex currently, though other people are recieving from me. I recently upgraded to xp and have re-entered my email account. What could be the cause of this selective refusal to send my emails?
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3 REPLIES
N/A

RE: Problems sending email

What error, if any are given for the refusal?
Galileo
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 31-07-2007

RE: Problems sending email

> What error, if any are given for the refusal?

Sorry not to have got back to you before, some email gets through fine and some disappears but without trace and doesn't bounce. Whether it's particular servers I have a problem with don't know. Certainly people with aol and pipex accounts have been a problem. I recently upgraded to XP but re entered my email account etc. Thanks for any suggestions - Jonathan
Galileo
Newbie
Posts: 4
Registered: 31-07-2007

RE: Problems sending email

> > What error, if any are given for the refusal?
>
> Sorry not to have got back to you before, some email gets through fine and some disappears but without trace and doesn't bounce. Whether it's particular servers I have a problem with don't know. Certainly people with aol and pipex accounts have been a problem. I recently upgraded to XP but re entered my email account etc. Thanks for any suggestions - Jonathan
>
I found this in the internet, could it be the source of the problem?
Some companies or individuals who have their own mail server operating on a dynamic IP address sometimes encounter a peculiar situation. They find that sometimes their email messages are delivered to some recipients but refused by the email server of other recipients. One of the reasons that this occurs is that some organizations, AOL and others, try to protect their subscribers from receiving SPAM. One way to accomplish this is to verify that the sender is legitimate by performing a "reverse lookup." Here's how that works.

When you send an email message and your mail server completes the connection with the receiving server it tells the receiving server your current IP address. This is part of the SMTP protocol (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol). Your IP address that your server reported "belongs" to your ISP and it was temporarily assigned to you by your ISP. The receiving server performs a "reverse DNS lookup" on your IP address to determine the domain name associated with that address. (Commonly a DNS lookup starts with the domain name and then finds the associated IP address. The "reverse DNS lookup" starts with the IP address and finds the domain name.) It finds that the domain name associated with that IP address is the domain name of your ISP.

Next your server sends a "HELO" message to the receiving server and that message contains your domain name. The receiving server compares the domain name it discovered through performing the "reverse lookup" with the domain name your server sent. When these two domain names are not the same then the receiving server assumes that the email message is SPAM and rejects it. Not all receiving servers perform the "reverse lookup" so your email may be rejected in some cases but not all cases.

To solve this dilemma you should send your email out through your ISP's server, not yours. To accomplish that you need to know the IP address of your ISP's server and you can find that by contacting your ISP. Some of our customers have told us that their ISP wasn't immediately forthcoming with that information but they were able to get the IP address by explaining that they needed it to configure Outlook for use with the free email account that the ISP offers and to accomplish that they need the ISP mail server's IP address. In many cases sending mail through your ISP will solve the problem sending email from a dynamic IP address.