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Connecting using ethernet modem

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Connecting using ethernet modem

I am unable to access when using my laptop when I use my ethernet Modem, (DLink 300G+), when I renew my IP I keep getting the 192 address from the Modem so I can only assume that this is a firewall problem (zonealarm) I'veut I've fiddled with the configuration but no joy.

If I use my USB modem I have no connection problems !!!, but I would rather use the ethernet modem then I would be able to share with my other PC

Anyone any suggestions :?:

Thanks
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Re: Connecting using ethernet modem

Quote
I am unable to access when using my laptop when I use my ethernet Modem, (DLink 300G+), when I renew my IP I keep getting the 192 address from the Modem so I can only assume that this is a firewall problem (zonealarm) I'veut I've fiddled with the configuration but no joy.


Remember, when you're using your ADSL router (Ethernet modem), any PC or laptop connected to it needs to know where to direct traffic which is destined for the Internet. You have to tell it this (or arrange for it to be configured through DHCP), and it's done by setting the default route.

The default route represents the first hop the traffic should take from its present location towards its ultimate destination. From your laptop/PC the first hop for Internet-bound traffic should be to your ADSL Router, so the default route must identify the IP Address of the router (that is, the IP Address on the local side of the router, not the WAN side - in your case, this is a 192 address).

On a Windows box, if you enter this command, the thing to look for is the Default Gateway:

ipconfig /all

If the Default Gateway shown for the ethernet adapter is the IP address of your ADSL Router, then it's correctly configured, and your problem lies elsewhere. If there's no address shown, or it's not the LAN-side IP Address of the router, then it's incorrectly configured, and needs to be changed (through control panel, exact details depend on which version of Windows, but it boils down to TCP/IP properties).

You can test where it's going wrong by doing a traceroute (conveniently abbreviated to tracert by our friends at Redmond). For example, to traceroute to a known IP address (one of the DNS servers):

tracert 212.159.13.49

This will show each hop in the network path to the destination server. If it can't reach the destination, it'll indicate how far it got. My guess, assuming your default route is not set, is that it won't even be able to make the first hop, and it'll show this straight away.

Even if the default route configuration is correct, try the tracert command anyway, for this will give an idea of where the problem is.