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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

OK, now here's what I want to do:

I have the 2 routers mentioned in the topic subject. I want to use the D-Link 504 as an ADSL modem and use the Linksys as the router. So all my pc's will be connected to the Linksys, which will then have the D-link 504 connected to it's internet ethernet port and use it as the ADSL modem. I want the Linksys to do all the NAT, firewall and port forwarding stuff using the D-Link 504 basically as a ADSL Modem with ethernet connecter (i.e. the D-Link 500, I believe).


Here's why I want to:
The Linksys doesn't have an adsl modem built into it, but it does seem to have some very nice config stuff, especially the port forwarding. It also has WiFi on it and it wouldbe nice to have all pc's talking to one router so they don't have to send information via 2 router and thus across a network cable, which I could see becoming a bottleneck.
The D-Link 504 does have an adsl modem in it but it's config stuff seem to be rougher around the edges than the linksys stuff and port forwarding hasn't looked easy.


Can this be done, if so can anyone tell me how (or point me to somewhere that does)?

Also is it possible to change the linksys routers subnet mask to be a class b or class a network?

Thanks.

Aron.
8 REPLIES
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

The distinction you make between the D-Link 504 and D-Link 500 is one commonly expressed in broadband circles, but it's a false one in my view. Because the 500 has a single port for connection of PCs whereas the 504 has a built-in 4 port switch does not mean the first is an "ADSL Ethernet modem" but the second an "ADSL Router" -- both are "routers". What makes them routers is that they both make routing decisions based on IP addresses.

In networking terms, you want your D-Link to work as a "bridge" rather than a "router", operating at the Ethernet level (ie dealing with Ethernet frames [which happen to contain IP packets] and Ethernet addresses [MAC addresses] rather than IP addresses). In other words, working one level down from a "router". Exactly as a network switch does -- it has no IP address itself, because it's not working at that level, and simply shifts Ethernet frames between devices, unconcerned about the fact that what is being carried in the frame is an IP packet.

I've no idea if the D-Link routers offer this capability. (I know the D-Link 300G+ does, and its manufacturer describes that as an "ADSL Modem" just to further confuse the terminology -- it makes me think of a USB device. Why they couldn't use the word "Bridge" I do not know!)

Even if the 504 does not offer a bridge mode, you can still use it in its normal router mode. Of course, it'll be operating rather differently from how you intended, but the end result will be the same. As a router, the 504 will have an IP address at each of its "WAN" and "LAN" interfaces and necessarily it will be set to perform NAT. The Linksys will also have two IP addresses, one on its "WAN" interface (set for the same network as the LAN IP address as the D-Link) and a second IP address at its LAN interface, in a different network from its other interface. Your PCs will be in this network. The Linksys, too, will be configured to perform NAT. If the D-Link offers a "DMZ" option, the IP address used at the Linksys "WAN" interface can be specified as the DMZ host, which means the port forwarding specified at the Linksys will be the one which is effective; you'll have to do no further port forwarding at the D-Link.

Concerning the change of subnet mask: What you really mean is you want the Linksys to use a Class A or Class B IP address (I assume you mean at its "LAN" interface). I'd be very surprised if you could not do this, but you must bear in mind the addresses used here are "private" addresses, and you are restricted to certain networks for private use. The only Class A network for private use is network 10 (ie addresses 10.x.x.x with a netmask of 255.0.0.0). For Class B you could use any one of the 16 networks from 172.16 to 172.31 inclusive (addresses 172.16.x.x to 172.31.x.x with a netmask of 255.255.0.0). Note the masks given are the netmasks implied by the network numbers of each address and indicate, for the networks given, that subnetting is not in effect. Having chosen a network you can then subnet to a lower level if you so desire (but why? -- since it adds an extra level of complication, have a good reason for doing it). On a Class C network (such as the good old trusty 192.168.0 beloved of equipment manufacturers) and a netmask of 255.255.255.0, you have the capacity for 254 devices. Enough for most home networks, surely?
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

Thanks.

I think I sort of get it.
I looked in the manual for information on using the router as a bridge and found this:

Using this method, the DSL-504 acts as a transparent bridge, and is invisible to other devices on both the WAN and LAN side of the bridge. It is therefore necessary to provide some means of acquiring global IP settings for
your account.
All connections to the Internet require a unique global IP address. For bridged connections, the global IP settings must reside in a TCP/IP enabled device on the LAN side of the bridge, such as a PC, server or firewall hardware.
The IP address can be assigned in a number of ways. Your network service provider will give you instructions about any additional connection software or NIC configuration that may be required.


So it may be worth me reading up on this.

I take it from your second suggestion that I could just set a DMZ on the D-Link and set it to point to the LAN IP address of the Linksys. Do I need to disable NAT or anything on the D-Link when I do this?
I take it that doing it this way I would just connect the two routers normally and not use the internet/modem ethernet port on the Linksys?

Task,
should the D-Link manual have more instructions on setting the 504 up as a bridge, would you mind if I asked you a few more questions if I don't understand the instructions given in the manual?

Thanks a lot for your reply.
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

Within the D-Link 504 router config I can change the encapsulation to Bridge LLC or Bridge VC mux.

I take it I would need to select one of these (the rest of the config then changes, becoming much simpler). I'm not sure which one I need to select though.

Any ideas?

After that I think it seems pretty straight forward (or infact nearly done), at least for that router!
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

"aronjasper": Can't say I know much more about these connections than I've told you -- I've never tried setting one up myself. I'm happy to help where I can, but I don't speak from experience on this. That bridging mode of the router sounds very promising to me, though: transparent bridge, invisible to other devices on both the WAN and LAN side of the bridge is exactly what you're after. I'd be inclined to try the "Bridge VC mux" first, since "VC Mux" is how our normal PPPoA connections are set up. With a bit of luck, your public IP address will get propagated across to the WAN interface of the Linksys (what I think the second paragraph of your quote was saying), which means the D-Link will have truly become transparent from the network point of view. If that doesn't work, you could try assigning the public IP address manually.

The other suggestion was entirely separate from trying the D-Link as a bridge. Yes, you would set up the two routers normally, and both the D-Link and the Linksys would do NAT processing. In this configuration, the only device in your home network that the D-Link would be aware of would be the Linksys (its WAN interface) [since NAT on the Linksys would hide the addresses of your PCs from the D-Link]. So, by setting up the Linksys WAN interface as the "DMZ host" as far as the D-Link is concerned, it takes care of any port forwarding issues on the D-Link -- it will simply forward everything to the WAN interface of the Linksys, thus leaving the Linksys to sort out port forwarding to the final PC.
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

Thanks for this, it's been a great help.
Just got to get around to trying it now.

I've also noticed that the Linksys allows you to set the MTU in it's config.
As I wasn't previously able to change it I've sort of lost track, what is the ideal MTU setting now?
I thought it was like 1438, but I also think I remember something about BT updating their equipment so it would work better at 1500. Did this ever get done?

Cheers.
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

Yes, they did -- but look at MTU Tweak (on the PlusNet forum).
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

Cant get into the Forum with my F9 password?
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Combining D-Link 504 ADSL Router & Linksys Wireless-G Ro

No, use the guest account.

In the longer term, you can register for a free PlusNet account (the username razorhazor2003 is unlikely to have been taken) and then ask Ian Wild to give it posting permissions on the PlusNet forum.