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ADSL Gateway config problems when using a static IP block

inkasecsol
Newbie
Posts: 2
Registered: 06-08-2007

ADSL Gateway config problems when using a static IP block

Hi folks

Does anyone else have F9 ADSL setup and working with their own ADSL equipment and working with a static ip block? if so would be grateful for any help/pointers for the gateway setup, I have a linksys AG041 (yes I know its old but it works perfectly with my other BT ADSL, so I am pretty sure it functions correctly) but despite numerous configuration setting attempts I can't get it to work with this F9 ADSL .

TIA ... JonnyR...
5 REPLIES
astarsolutions
Grafter
Posts: 393
Registered: 26-07-2007

ADSL Gateway config problems when using a static IP block

What doesn't work?

All you need to do is enter you normal login details, the router will then get it's IP address automatically.
The gateway (for computers on your LAN) will be your routers IP address.

Once the internet connection is working, you then need to setup NAT and open ports on your firewall to make use of the IP address.
inkasecsol
Newbie
Posts: 2
Registered: 06-08-2007

ADSL Gateway config problems when using a static IP block

Thanx for the reply Arthur, but that is just the point, I have a static ip block (16 REAL ip addresses assigned to me by F9) so I do not have to use NAT as I have several servers that require REAL ip addresses, so my set up is a no NAT one.

JonnyR
astarsolutions
Grafter
Posts: 393
Registered: 26-07-2007

ADSL Gateway config problems when using a static IP block

NAT will still be the best option, you can configure your router to forward each external IP address to each internal IP address, forwarding some of the ports for added security or all of them.

**I haven't tried the following, this is just based on my understanding of network addressing and routing**
No NAT will require you to configure your router as a modem, i.e. passing the external IP address straight through, you will then need some other piece of kit to assign these IP address to different machines.
The whole point of a router is to convert from one address range (the outside world) to another (your network) you don't want to do that you want to assign the outside IP addresses directly to your machines.

I run a network with several servers hosting various services and I use NAT to "relay" IP address from my 2 ADSL connections to the LAN.

NAT has got nothing to do with making use of dynamic IP's or very few IP's its about Translating Network Address from the real world to your LAN.
N/A

ADSL Gateway config problems when using a static IP block

I'm interested to know how to get this working too.

I always thought that having no-NAT means that you don't have separate ip addresses for your internal and external networks.... I thought you just assign all your machines directly with external IP addresses from within your block, although I can see this getting more complex if you have more machines on your network than avaiable IP's in your block... in which case astarsolutions method seems to make sense.

I do know that if you have a block of 16 ip's then you cant use the first and last numbers, resulting in you having 14 effective ip's available.
astarsolutions
Grafter
Posts: 393
Registered: 26-07-2007

ADSL Gateway config problems when using a static IP block

I have had another think and the following should work.
-Setup you router as a modem, i.e. pass the signal straight through
-Connect this directly to your network / hub etc...
-Manually assign one of your 13 (you don't want to use the router/modem IP) external IP's to each of the computers by entering the IP into the network settings.
-Gateway address would be force9's gateway as you are doing no local routing of your own.

You would then need a separate Router (not router modem) to connect the network switch to another network switch in order to connect "normal" computers to.
The first switch or combination of switches would form your DMZ and the second your internal LAN.
Important: the networks can only be physically connected by the second router.