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Switching router off for electrical work

nickascii
Dabbler
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎22-01-2015

Switching router off for electrical work

Hi,
I will be having some electrical wiring work done and I'll probably need to turn off the
electricity several times over several days which means router will need to go off as well
Now Plusnet say its best to leave router on all time so it doesn't think there's a problem on the line.
So whats the best approach so I don't loose my speed. E.g. leave router switched off all day
whilst electrical work ongoing ?
(I've only been on plusnet for about 3 weeks but speed is stable now and upload has been uncapped)
21 REPLIES
catelliott
Grafter
Posts: 242
Thanks: 1
Registered: ‎05-02-2015

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Hi there,
My best advice would be to avoid turning it off and on too much, if it's possible to turn it off then fire it back up once the electrical work is done, that's probably your best bet Smiley
supernova1
Grafter
Posts: 106
Registered: ‎17-11-2013

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Make sure you do a graceful disconnect - don't just switch it off !
Log in to your router,
click the diconnect - wait about a minute
Switch off your router.
Don't turn it back on within 10 mins.
This will ensure the exchange DLM doesn't drop your speed next time you connect.
ATB
SN
Community Veteran
Posts: 19,102
Thanks: 443
Fixes: 21
Registered: ‎31-08-2007

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Well SN has beaten me to giving exactly the advise about "graceful" disconnects that I would give. There is nothing worse for ensuring that the Exchange Dynamic Line Management believes you have a dropping connection than unexpected disconnects but especially multiple Disconnects and Connects in a small time frame which could occur when electrical work is taking place.
Leave it off until work has finished (for the day certainly). However one thing to note. As mentioned in your previous thread, your line ought to be capable of faster speed (on paper) than you've previously had. There can be a number of reasons why it isn't, and a lot will be external factors that you can't do anything about, but one reason which you can do something about is possibly the wiring of your extension. The bell wire may be connected and/or it may not be twisted pair wiring. This means it will be picking up general interference seen as noise by your ADSL and this reduced the number of bits your line can handle with the consequence of reduced speed.
One of the other consequences if his is the case, is that if you switch on near dusk or after dark when there is generally more noise, then you can get slower sync speeds than if you switch on in daylight hours.
If you'd like to pursue this further then post back and advise if you have a Master Socket similar to the one on the left? (or even one of the others).
mdc
Grafter
Posts: 44
Registered: ‎15-02-2015

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Quote from: Anotherone
There can be a number of reasons why it isn't, and a lot will be external factors that you can't do anything about, but one reason which you can do something about is possibly the wiring of your extension. The bell wire may be connected and/or it may not be twisted pair wiring. This means it will be picking up general interference seen as noise by your ADSL and this reduced the number of bits your line can handle with the consequence of reduced speed.

If he's having the place re-wired... Cat7? Cheesy
Community Veteran
Posts: 19,102
Thanks: 443
Fixes: 21
Registered: ‎31-08-2007

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Gross overkill for ADSL, big ugly cable. CW1308 is not only good enough, but what Openreach use.
mdc
Grafter
Posts: 44
Registered: ‎15-02-2015

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Yeah, Cat7 is a bit extreme. Although I can't help wonder if a lot of the issues people have these days couldn't have been eliminated/minimized had BT GPO deployed screened cable in the first place...
Community Veteran
Posts: 19,102
Thanks: 443
Fixes: 21
Registered: ‎31-08-2007

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

In GPO days, considering the frequencies that lines were intended to cope with, balanced twisted pair was perfectly adequate. Todays tech does extremely well shoving 100Mbps+ (Fibre speeds) down twisted pair cable. The big problem is attenuation.
nickascii
Dabbler
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎22-01-2015

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Thanks,
the cable comes in from outside (orange and white wires) into a little box with BT on it, then off to what looks like a NTE5 master
about 10 meters of cable away)
Looks like it goes via 4 core cable white to blue, orange to orange, green and brown not used?
Another cable then comes out of the master off to the extension socket about another 10 meters of cable.
When I unscrewed the master my internet went off, oops (live and learn).
Photos attached.
Does it look ok or could it be improved ?
Community Veteran
Posts: 19,102
Thanks: 443
Fixes: 21
Registered: ‎31-08-2007

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

I'm out on a mobile device atm, so it will take me a while to look at the pics. But from what you have said yes it needs to be changed.  I'll post more later.
jem16
Grafter
Posts: 874
Registered: ‎27-10-2014

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Quote from: nickascii
Does it look ok or could it be improved ?

The bell wire - orange/white (on connector 3) is attached at both Master socket and extension. You need to remove this at both ends and only leave the blue/white, white/blue wires attached.
I'll leave Anotherone to deal with the 1st picture.
nickascii
Dabbler
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎22-01-2015

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Quote
The bell wire - orange/white (on connector 3) is attached at both Master socket and extension. You need to remove this at both ends and only leave the blue/white, white/blue wires attached.

So definitely remove the orange/white one  "connector 3 on extension" and "middle connector on master" ? Snip it or just pull it out ?
Seems a bit drastic, does it not serve any purpose ?
jem16
Grafter
Posts: 874
Registered: ‎27-10-2014

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Quote from: nickascii
So definitely remove the orange/white one  "connector 3 on extension" and "middle connector on master" ? Snip it or just pull it out ?

Gently pulling it out will be better so nothing is left attached to the connector.
Quote
Seems a bit drastic, does it not serve any purpose ?

It's what's pulling your BB speed down as it's basically acting like an antenna for interference.
It used to serve a purpose in the days when phones required the bell wire to ring. Modern phones don't require that now and some that still do the filter will do that job.
Community Veteran
Posts: 19,102
Thanks: 443
Fixes: 21
Registered: ‎31-08-2007

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

In a broadband situation the bell wire or its mate on 4 is not needed. Filters provide a local bell wire connection for any phone that may be plugged into it.  The main bell wire is unfiltered and unbalances the line picking up interference which results in reduced speed. jem16 types quicker than me on my mobile Grin
jem16
Grafter
Posts: 874
Registered: ‎27-10-2014

Re: Switching router off for electrical work

Quote from: Anotherone
jem16 types quicker than me on my mobile Grin

I hope you're using Swift Key then as your keyboard.  Tongue