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Querying line speed

Method0ne
Grafter
Posts: 108
Registered: 12-12-2008

Querying line speed

Noticed a lot of posts about this recently, and decided I might just have to ask myself about just what is actually happening with my line speed since the system went over to the dslMax system.
When testing using the BT speedtest linked through kitz' site, it's telling me my IP is 4500, not that I have much of a clue what that means, as my head always seems to get a little fuzzy when I try and take in too much info at once, but basically that's what BT thinks is my max stable connect rate right?
If that's the case, then I can understand if my current connection varies per login, it seems to be how the max system works, though I have to say, the synch rate listed by my modem (Binatone ADSL500 freebie from way back when I first signed up (BB EasyStart I think was the product at the time, old legacy anyway)) only seems to connect around the 5250 mark or higher, most often at the 5856 mark as below, but on a few rare occasions goes as high as the low 7000's
That's the first part I dont get.
The other part I dont get, is that even if my IP is actually 4500, should that not mean, being that when I had the 512k and 2mb services I had 50-60kbps and 200-220kbps respectively, that I should in all likelihood be attaining a possible 400-450kbps throughput at the current time on this line?
If I'm mistaken, then please point me in the right direction, as I've never witnessed more than the 200-220kbps that I previously had, even though I'm supposedly getting a faster service.
PlusNet Member Center page regarding my current IP;
Quote
High-speed Broadband
Estimated line speed:
    Not recorded (service activated before we introduced estimates).
Current line speed:
    4500
Your estimated line speed
If we've done a line check for you, we provide an estimate of the broadband speed that your line should support.
Please see above for the 'Estimate line speed'.
If we're unable to provide a line check, we give you the option of continuing without a speed estimate, in which case you'd see the Speed Estimate as "Opted out".

Also figured I'd throw the ADSL Status page of my modem in for good measure, since it contains line stats that may be useful to anyone reading.

                  Downstream  Upstream
SNR Margin     15.8 27.0 dB
Line Attenuation  31.6 16.0 dB
Errored Seconds    0         0
Loss of Signal     0         0
Loss of Frame     0         0
CRC Errors     0         0
Data Rate     5248 448 kbps
Latency     INTERLEAVED INTERLEAVED

BT Speedtest result from IE (I had to reconnect modem to get the above info, this was approx 20 mins earlier);
Quote
Test1 comprises of Best Effort Test:  -provides background information.
    Your DSL connection rate: 5856 kbps(DOWN-STREAM),  448 kbps(UP-STREAM)
    IP profile for your line is - 4500 kbps
    Actual IP throughput achieved during the test was - 198 kbps
This test was not conclusive and further testing is required.

Upon selecting the continue button to do the further tests, it tells me to enter my modem settings and:-
Change my username to "bt_test_user@plusdsl.net"
Blank the password field
Save settings and reboot
Then click a link to carry out the further tests.
This results in my modem (Binatone ADSL500) synching, but not connecting to anything, so the tests cannot continue due to the inevitable 404 error, I'm at a loss as to where to go from there, but I get the distinct feeling it's not quite working properly Wink
As i say, I dont really know as much as you guys do out there, and I'm by no means complaining, since I have yet to see any drastic reduction in speeds like some of the users posting on here seem to have gotten, I'm just curious to know if I'm actually getting the speeds I'm supposed to be, or whether there's more to be had out of my line.
Thankyou in advance for your time,
Regards,
Mr. Kev
10 REPLIES
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 18,581
Thanks: 1,855
Fixes: 234
Registered: 11-01-2008

Re: Querying line speed

You might well see an improvement if you upgrade to a router from your USB modem, a lot of USB modems don't support above 2Mb.
Your line stats show that there is probably more to get out if it, as your SNR is quite high, again might be to do with the modem but could be something else.

Customer / Moderator / If it helped click the thumb / If it fixed it click 'This fixed my problem'

Community Veteran
Posts: 1,850
Registered: 11-08-2007

Re: Querying line speed

that thing is a useless waste of my time.  it never gets beyond 96%.  i use thinkbroadband and mybroadbandspeed.  both are easy, reliable and don't insist on personal input of a phone number and email address.
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,789
Registered: 08-06-2007

Re: Querying line speed

And neither of those show the BT IP Profile, so they're pretty useless if that's the piece of information that you're looking for - which is also why it needs your phone number
My  first suggestion is to echo adiewoo's suggestion - look at investing in a new router. 
Your SNR margin is very high which indicates possible extension wiring issues, or a faulty modem or filter.  Have you tried pluggng your current modem into the BT Test socket (unscrew the faceplate of the master socket to access the test socket in most cases).  If you could try that, and report back the modem "Sync Speed" downstream whilst connected that would be useful.
In addition, I reckon your RWIN is likely to be set to a non-optimum figure, but lets get your sync speed sorted first.
With a bit of luck and a thousand pygmies, we might be able to get you an 8128k sync, so ~750kB/s downloads.
B
Method0ne
Grafter
Posts: 108
Registered: 12-12-2008

Re: Querying line speed

Thanks for the replies folks, few handy pieces of info there.
Have been looking into getting a proper router sorted for a while now, but havent really managed to get around to it what with all the differences in specs and the constantly changing product line-ups on the market, never been too sure what's worth investing in, especially since I'm not interested in wireless in the slightest.
As for extension issues, that could be a main factor of the SNR being so high, our master socket is in the main hallway of the house, and currently all the computers are upstairs, I'm running through quite an extension to hit that socket (it's also the only one in the house) so that may be the main source of the problem.
Downside is, without unplugging and re-situating my entire rig, testing at the master socket is pretty much out of the question at present, although if done so it would give a better indication of the true line stats, I'll have to look into the possibility of doing this, though it would mean quite a hefty move - 19" CRT's aint light - and would also require finding an extension lead due to there being no socket within 15 feet of the hallway.
I'll have a look into this in the morning, it's a bit late now to be moving things around the house.
Also, on the BT Test socket point, is that all I would be able to do whilst connected to that socket? or can other tests be run from there also? (e.g. throughput tests)
Thanks for your time,
Regards,
Mr. Kev
Edit;
If any of you have suggestions as to the best make/model of router (with built in modem) and/or the best filters to use then I'll look into what I can get sorted on that front, probably wont be an upgrade for a while though, christmas and all.
Superuser
Superuser
Posts: 9,677
Thanks: 1,074
Fixes: 60
Registered: 06-04-2007

Re: Querying line speed

The reason for using the test socket is that plugging your modem into that (using a good quality microfilter) totally eliminates any effects from your internal wiring. If sync speed is higher when using that you know your internal wiring is causing problems. Fixing those is down to you.
When plugged into the test socket a telephone can be plugged into the microfilter phone socket if desired, and you can do exactly the same on the Internet as you can when the modem is plugged into its normal extention socket. All you'll have done is taken internal wiring out of the circuit.
If your telephone is a cordless one (especially) it is best to disconnect it while you do the initial check. If plugging it in causes a change, that's another problem to resolve.
David
Method0ne
Grafter
Posts: 108
Registered: 12-12-2008

Re: Querying line speed

Thanks for the clarification, spraxyt, much appreciated.
Looks like I'll probably be having to lug this box of mine downstairs in the morning and find me a power extension to check on this.
Whilst I'm here, been having a look-see for options on a new router setup, and unfortunately it looks as if I'm going to need to do some re-wiring anyway, at the very least for a power source if I locate it by the master socket (should that be the cause of my problem), and even more so if I opt to keep my wired setup!
Seems I may need to go the wireless route after all, which I'm not extravagantly happy about doing in the first place, being as I pay most of my bills over the internet, and having read that recent report regarding even the most secure wireless encryption being hackable doesn't exactly ease my mind about doing so!
On the new router front, I've been looking around on Broadband Buyer and I'm liking the look of a couple of products I've spotted on there, firstly the cheaper option of the Netgear DGN2000 with associated extras to hook up everything here that comes in at around £150, and then the more expensive option which is the Draytek Vigor 2820Vn with extras at around £260 (or about £17 more with the upgraded aerial pack).
Anyone have any experience or comments on either of those two setups?
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 18,581
Thanks: 1,855
Fixes: 234
Registered: 11-01-2008

Re: Querying line speed

Is there any particular reason why you wanted to get a wireless 'N' router? The standard hasn't been ratified yet so is subject to change and you aren't guaranteed compatibility between different brands 'N' products.
One of the often recommended routers on these forums is a Netgear DG834G and is around 1/2 the price of the one you were looking at http://www.broadbandbuyer.co.uk/Shop/ShopDetail.asp?ProductID=5389.
I've got a friend with the Vigor router and he has an issue at the moment where he can only connect 1 wireless device at a time to it, so is having to use an access point whilst their support tries to work out what is wrong.

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Method0ne
Grafter
Posts: 108
Registered: 12-12-2008

Re: Querying line speed

No particular reason, I just looked into the N product line-up as it was the highest possible speed/range.
Like I said earlier in this thread, I know next to nothing about wireless products, and to be fair, I'd much prefer wired, but pending tests at the master socket, I may have to go wireless due to the length of distance involved, well, that or run several 10 meter lengths of cat5 down through the house.
Speaking of those tests, I may have to postpone them til tomorrow, just been checking dates for a few things and came to the unavoidable conclusion that I've somehow lost a day this week, so unfortunately I'm back at work in a couple of hours..
I was sure today was saturday too, was looking forward to a few lunchtime beers, guess I'll just be the one serving them  Cry
Denzil
Grafter
Posts: 1,733
Registered: 31-07-2007

Re: Querying line speed

Wireless G standard (the current latest before N) is still much faster than your broadband speed, so you won't gain anything by going for N. No security system is infallible, but as long as you use WPA encryption and not WEP you are pretty safe.
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 18,581
Thanks: 1,855
Fixes: 234
Registered: 11-01-2008

Re: Querying line speed

You could just run 1 length of CAT5 and then buy a switch (e.g. http://www.broadbandbuyer.co.uk/Shop/ShopDetail.asp?ProductID=1621) with the money you save buying a cheaper router  Smiley

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