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Openreach Modem and Router

spudy12
Grafter
Posts: 66
Thanks: 1
Registered: ‎24-07-2013

Openreach Modem and Router

Strange question here, If I was to move my openreach fibre modem to somewhere closer to where it comes in to my house, would I then be able to connect this to my current modem using powerline networking plugs? (NO OTHER DEVICES USING POWERLINE NETWORKING)
3 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,319
Thanks: 86
Fixes: 3
Registered: ‎08-01-2008

Re: Openreach Modem and Router

I think there's some confusion in your terminology, the BT Openreach 'box' is a modem but the device you connect to it should be a router.
The BT OR Modem is normally positioned close to the master socket, it is normally connected to the router by an ethernet cable.  This connection can be done via powerplugs (as they provide an ethernet connection via the ring main) but performance may be reduced as this topic explains: http://community.plus.net/forum/index.php/topic,126114.0.html
Call me 'w23'
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spudy12
Grafter
Posts: 66
Thanks: 1
Registered: ‎24-07-2013

Re: Openreach Modem and Router

Yes I realise that the White openreach box is, in its own sense a modem (Whats the proper term for this?). But I do still require a 'modem' that also acts as the NAT router to connect through PPPoE to plus net.
Thanks for the link. In my circumstance my Master socket is actually further away than the from where the line comes in to our house. (The joys of living in really old houses)
If I was to connect the openreach modem to the socket where the line comes directly in to the house, would I see any increase in internet speed?
Plusnet Staff
Plusnet Staff
Posts: 6,346
Thanks: 31
Fixes: 5
Registered: ‎26-11-2011

Re: Openreach Modem and Router

Hi spudy12,
If you can locate your Master Socket and use this, you see an increase in speeds but it's difficult to tell without knowing what the quality of your internal wiring is.
With regards to the Homeplugs - my first warning is; don't expect full speeds using these, they are a great solution and are generally better than wireless but they don't guarantee to carry full speeds.
Wherever you decide to connect your Modem, it will need a router connecting to the modem. Once you have this setup in place you'll be able to run 1 Homeplug to a power source and Ethernet to and from the router/powerline adapter.
From then on, you can put the other homeplug anywhere in your house (assuming it's all on the same electrical circuit). From the second Homeplug, you'd Ethernet from it and into the device you're wanting to connect up to.
Chris Pettitt
Cloud Environments Engineer