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How do you know snr setting?

BLINDPEW
Grafter
Posts: 88
Registered: 04-08-2007

How do you know snr setting?

How can you find out what your SNR is set at and if for instance it's set at 9 and your SNR drops below this let's say to 8, would you lose connection or is the setting of 9 there just to cap your ip profile?
3 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 38,423
Thanks: 1,008
Fixes: 58
Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: How do you know snr setting?

I assume that you are asking about the default SNR.
The only way to check that is to do a resync and then check the noise margin reported by your router immediately afterwards.
The effect of the default noise margin is only to set the starting conditions at the resync.
Once you are connected the router will hang onto the connection until either the noise overwhelms the signal or the error rates become unacceptably high.
Typically the line will stay in sync down to about 3 - 4 dB depending on the quality of the line.
For example my line will hold down to about 3dB but the error rates can become unacceptable at 3.5dB.
There are two things to note
On a very quiet line the noise margin can drop lower without problems and not all routers report the same noise margin (typical error is +/-0.5dB
BLINDPEW
Grafter
Posts: 88
Registered: 04-08-2007

Re: How do you know snr setting?

Thanks for the quick reply. That puts my mind at rest, has your explanation concurs to what happened to me. My connection dropped 2 days ago and showed an SNR of 9 but this has been going has low has 7 and I was hoping that this would not cause my connection to drop. So I suppose my SNR is set at 9, but would I be right in thinking that if my connection holds out for the 400 hours that gets mentioned on this site my SNR should drop to 6? May I just add that I'm on ADSL2+.
Community Veteran
Posts: 38,423
Thanks: 1,008
Fixes: 58
Registered: 15-06-2007

Re: How do you know snr setting?

I wouldn't hold your breath as it seems look at all sorts of things (error rates included) using an unknown algorithm.
It may or it may not - it's in the lap of the gods  Grin