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Does anyone think that plusnet actually care about existing, ong term customers?

thefreemans
Newbie
Posts: 1
Registered: 13-11-2015

Does anyone think that plusnet actually care about existing, ong term customers?

Those that don't grumble too much, those that live in a rubbish speed rural area and just take it ?
I've been with plusnet for over ten years, and tolerated some pretty crap service because I live in the sticks. But I'm starting to feel like I'm just ignored. Try and watch a film on netflix, and it buffers to death on a friday night and I have to stop half way through. Try and work from home during the day and I have to apologise for not being able to keep in touch. Try and contact something called "customer services" and I have to go through so many layers of shite that I just give up. "Ask Jess" ? Piss in the wind more like. Plusnet are utter crap right now and I don't know how to let them know.
2 REPLIES
Gel
Seasoned Pro
Posts: 1,536
Thanks: 159
Fixes: 12
Registered: 02-08-2007

Re: Does anyone think that plusnet actually care about existing, ong term customers?

Cameron has promised decent (ie fast) broadband for all, will soon become a statutory obligation on the providers; until then....... Angry
Where we live local Council, on back of current government scheme (for rural areas) is rolling out fibre, but
at an unacceptable cost: I'll be waiting for Openreach to attain decent speeds under new statutory obligations.
Community Veteran
Posts: 471
Thanks: 35
Fixes: 2
Registered: 26-09-2015

Re: Does anyone think that plusnet actually care about existing, ong term customers?

Quote from: Gel
Cameron has promised decent (ie fast) broadband for all, will soon become a statutory obligation on the providers

Don't hold your breath, it's not until 2020.  Also they're only promising the right to "request" a speed of at least 5meg, according to what I read.  Nothing said about price or how it will be delivered, or about any of the other parameters such as latency and data allowances.  Unless these are clarified it's meaningless.  We already have a situation where remote users pay more for the service currently available, and there seems to be no move to even that out.
If you just go by data rate alone,  high speeds are already available everywhere via satellite.  We've been offered subsidised satellite services as part of the Scottish Government's initiative to extend high speed services to remote areas.  However even the subsidised price is way over landline costs (I binned the letter, but from from memory between £30 and £50 per month).  As well as high price the service would obviously suffer from satellite latency, and per month data allowances are very small, from 10GB/month up to only 30GB/month for the top service.  However if you're a politician then that's a target met - high speed broadband is on offer, and it's up to the customer whether they want it or not.