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Are these figures OK?

Jessica
Grafter
Posts: 254
Registered: 11-02-2008

Are these figures OK?

Yesterday I upgraded to Fibre.  I've done a few speed tests and I was wondering if these figures are good or not.  I had one disconnection about 10 minutes after going live.  I get confused between MB/s kbps mbps etc etc.

Let me know.
Thanks
13 REPLIES
Dhaos
Grafter
Posts: 140
Registered: 26-02-2013

Re: Are these figures OK?

Yes they are extremely good. You would be pushed to get much better.
Superuser
Superuser
Posts: 12,593
Thanks: 3,870
Fixes: 25
Registered: 22-08-2007

Re: Are these figures OK?

Quote from: Jessica
I get confused between MB/s kbps mbps etc etc.

Hi Jessica,
Haven't we all at some time or other?Huh
MB/s or MBps is Mega Bytes per second
Mbps (I'm sure you meant big "M" not little "m" see below) is Mega bits per second
kbps is killo bits per second
1 Byte = 8 bits
M = 106 - 1,000,000
k = 103 - 1,000
m = 10-3 - 0.001
1Mbps = 1000kbps
Note the above are decimal interpretations of M and k - I'll not bore you with the binary (2x) equivelents...

Lovely picture by the way.
Kevin
Jessica
Grafter
Posts: 254
Registered: 11-02-2008

Re: Are these figures OK?


The fastest I can download is 9.37MB/s.  Is that correct for a 74.78Mb/s connection?  Seems slow to me.
Thanks

petecov44
Grafter
Posts: 576
Registered: 29-05-2014

Re: Are these figures OK?

NO that's good
A 100Mbps connection can download at around 11MB/sec . A this is what I get - so you decide
Plusnet Staff
Plusnet Staff
Posts: 6,346
Thanks: 31
Fixes: 5
Registered: 26-11-2011

Re: Are these figures OK?

Those speeds are really, really good.
Have a look at http://community.plus.net/forum/index.php/topic,129947.msg1131202.html#msg1131202 as Townman has explained really well the differences between Mb/s and MB/s.
Chris Pettitt
Cloud Environments Engineer
petecov44
Grafter
Posts: 576
Registered: 29-05-2014

Re: Are these figures OK?

.
demonix01
Grafter
Posts: 34
Registered: 18-07-2014

Re: Are these figures OK?

74 divided by eight gives 9.25, so a download speed of 9.37 mega bytes would be about right for a 74.78 megabit connection (it's should be the easiest bit of maths to do as it's bits divided by 8 to give the speed in bytes).
petecov44
Grafter
Posts: 576
Registered: 29-05-2014

Re: Are these figures OK?

QA eh Chris? Nice one Smiley
Oneday we might get this as standard without bonding Wink
Dhaos
Grafter
Posts: 140
Registered: 26-02-2013

Re: Are these figures OK?

Rather than creating a new thread i thought i would post in this one, anyone any idea why i get 72.80 mbps on a speedtest but can only get 8.6MB/s over usenet, shouldnt it be 9.1?.
Superuser
Superuser
Posts: 12,593
Thanks: 3,870
Fixes: 25
Registered: 22-08-2007

Re: Are these figures OK?

It all depends!  This is a 5% variation and is I suggest within tolerance.  The higher suggested figure assumes no error handling and excludes protocol over heads.
Dhaos
Grafter
Posts: 140
Registered: 26-02-2013

Re: Are these figures OK?

Yeah dont cant be wrong im not complaining at all, im perfectly happy with 8.6MB/s, im just curious as to why i dont get 9.1
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,125
Thanks: 4
Registered: 14-08-2007

Re: Are these figures OK?

Depends on how you are measuring the MB/s. If it's your usenet client, it is probably only counting useful data (stuff that you are downloading). In addition to that, the usenet protocol will have some overheads. (control/signalling and error correction)
It is also unlikely that the usenet server is saturating your connection in the same way a speed tester is.
Superuser
Superuser
Posts: 12,593
Thanks: 3,870
Fixes: 25
Registered: 22-08-2007

Re: Are these figures OK?

Ah, curiosity - that killed the cat!
The synch speed is the total capacity of the line in bits.  These speed test tells you how fast you can move BYTES of DATA.
Working out the USEFUL BYTE RATE is not as simple as dividing the bit rate by eight as in 1byte = 8 bits.  A data file is not sent in one limp.  It is split in to fragments and sent across the network as packets.
For argument's sake, let's say that a fragment is 1000 bytes, to send a 1M byte file, there will need to be 1000 fragments wrapped up in "packet envelopes" and sent across the network.
Every fragment needs to be wrapped with a header and error check data.  That then needs to be wrapped with protocol control information - source / destination addresses, sequence number, status info and more error checking before being transmitted through the Internet.
When that packet hits your link, there has to be additional line control messages to acknowledge receipt, request retransmission and to generally control the link and keep it alive.
All of this essential control and management utilise some of the raw bit rate, resulting in a smaller capacity for the actual data.  This is why the line's "profile" is always lower than the raw synch speed.
On 21CN ADSL services,  11.8% of the synch rate is "reserved" for line and protocol management needs.  Getting around 95% of your synch rate in data through put is truly cooking on gas!