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uPnP??

Boundey
Grafter
Posts: 88
Registered: 30-07-2007

uPnP??

Right 3 months later and i'm still suffering from huge drop outs from the router....

This is my second DG814 router with latest firmware.

Think i have covered everything now...

Would uPnP be of any use to me? It is currently disabled by default on my router, just need to know whether or not to bother with it.

Changed ALL internal wiring in the house.

Had BT engineers in the house looking around and they found noise margins using the router were very large and that was what made me RMA my old router back and get a brand new DG814.

I had speeds trawling along for 4 days at 5k/sec until i changed the the filters in the house and it was flying but still cutting off.


I think i am loosing my head with this DG814 - Going to send it back to the retailer, get my money back and grab another router.... any recomendations?
7 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,983
Thanks: 8
Registered: 10-04-2007

uPnP??

uPnP is "Universal Plug and play" it's supposed to be of use only if you are wanting to run something like Windows Messenger or MSN networking.
The idea is that it should overcome the problems caused by the network address translation that the router does and allow you to send files, use audio and video with messenger and MSN.

For just ordinary connections and surfing ther net it's not needed.

As to your dropouts.
What figures are you seeing from the router for your line conditions.? ie dbs loss and signal to noise? (SNR)
mike001
Grafter
Posts: 393
Registered: 30-07-2007

uPnP??

I have had My DG814 for over a year now and had no probs with it.....apart from not connecting some times...I just drop into the Basic Settings and apply setting again ...allways works for me :-)
fallingwaters
Grafter
Posts: 222
Registered: 24-08-2007

uPnP??

If you are looking for alternatives, try the reviews on www.adslguide.org.uk

I have been using a Vigor 2600W since March without any problems, purchased from www.seg.co.uk

Good luck, Bill
N/A

uPnP??

I think UPnP is currently a "nice to have" feature, but one which will increasingly be used in future, and become more of a "must have" as further applications (and operating systems) support it. For routers implementing the UPnP Internet Gateway Device (IGD) specification, configuring "port forwarding" will become a thing of the past.

http://www.speedtouchdsl.com/pdf/UPnP_AppNote_ED01P01.pdf (1.1MB PDF file, but it shows the sorts of things current UPnP routers can do.)
Simon_M
Grafter
Posts: 684
Registered: 05-04-2007

uPnP??

UPnP is Microsoft's way of making sure that their applications aren't prevented from connecting to each other by an inconvenient firewall/NAT router that a home user is unsure how to set up correctly.

It passes control of what should or shouldn't be allowed through the router from the network administrator to the application.

This is fine where there is a small home network & the person administering the router has full control over all the PCs attached to the network & of what is running on them. It means that you can install the application that you want & let it sort out the firewall without any need to learn about port forwarding or the like.

You begin to see why "serious" firewall/router manufacturers won't touch it with a bargepole - it is a huge security risk.

Even in the home network environment it can be a problem - are you sure you know what the kids are running upstairs? Smiley

NAT (Network Address Translation) is a way of connecting a whole network to the internet with only a single public IP address. It was devised as a means of sharing round the limited number of available IP addresses.

It has a side benefit of increasing security, because the individual machines on the network are less exposed to outside attack. The drawback is they are less reachable by geniune approaches too.

UPnP is designed to circumvent NAT & put these machines back into the position of a single PC connected directly to the internet via a USB or PCI modem. Therefore the same advice would apply - never run such a machine on a ADSL connection without a software firewall screwed down as tight as you can get away with & still run the services you need.

The problem is, the very users who need to use UPnP are the ones who don't appreciate the risks. That's why we have all been bombarded with port 137 & ICMP attacks over the past few months from infected machines - most of whose owners have yet to realise that they are infected.

No, that is slightly unfair, but only in the way that is unfair to say it was your fault your car got stolen because you left it unlocked in the street overnight with the keys in the ignition. We all know the thief was the one really to blame.
Boundey
Grafter
Posts: 88
Registered: 30-07-2007

uPnP??

Quote


As to your dropouts.
What figures are you seeing from the router for your line conditions.? ie dbs loss and signal to noise? (SNR)


I wish i could tell you that. My router doesnt display those stats Sad

Everytime i ask plusnet to do it they always give me the wrong figures that i had asked for.

Thing is... the BT engineer came out, plugged in his router to test it using the whoosh. It was a perfect line... soon as my router went onto the line it dropped right down, thats when he said change your router so i did and heres the problem again.

He used one of those horrid green stringray modems! Sad
mike001
Grafter
Posts: 393
Registered: 30-07-2007

uPnP??

Just as a mater of intrest ...what versions of S/W is you gateway using.
And whats you MTU set at !