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Wireless Router

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Wireless Router

I Currently have a Solwise Router. I have recently purchased a Belkin Wireless/DSl Cable router. Unfortunately I can't get the Wirless router to work. What am I doing wrong - someone told me I cannot use two routers together, are they correct?
18 REPLIES
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Re: Wireless Router

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I Currently have a Solwise Router. I have recently purchased a Belkin Wireless/DSl Cable router. Unfortunately I can't get the Wirless router to work. What am I doing wrong - someone told me I cannot use two routers together, are they correct?


They're completely wrong. I use an ADSL router with a Cable/DSL router connected behind it. Both the routers do NAT processing, so to the ADSL router, it looks like the Cable/DSL router is the only device on my network.

What can't you get working with the Wireless router? The wireless part? Internet connectivity? How have you connected the routers together (can you describe your network)?
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Wireless Router

I'm a bit new to this. I can't get the internet to work on my PC, forget about getting my wirless network to work. Simply I have:

Connected the ADSL router into the Wifi router, (into the socket labeled internet / WAN)
I have then connected my PC directly into the the lan scocket using a network cable

Before I get the wifi to work I need to access my Pc via the routers and I can't get that to work. The point of having the wifi network is to allow me to use the laptop in other parts of the house etc.
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Wireless Router

Would I be correct in thinking your current arrangement is something like as shown in the diagram below. ADSL is your Solwise router, "Wireless" is the Belkin Cable/DSL Wireless Router, connected to the ADSL router from its "WAN" port and PC-A to PC-C are one or more PCs connected to the LAN ports of the wireless router.


If that's how you have it, all is well so far. (Incidentally, if your Solwise router has several ports, you might have some computers connected to that as well? -- that's also fine.)

The first thing you need to understand is that, in this arrangement, your home network actually consists of two different networks, connected together by the Wireless router. (Or, you could have two subnets within a single network, but let's avoid that complication, and settle for two networks.)

The network boundaries are shown by the dotted red lines in the diagram above.

There's one I've called the "perimeter network" which consists of half of the ADSL router (the "LAN" side of this router) and half of the Wireless router (the "WAN" side of this router). If there are any PCs directly connected to the Solwise, then they are also in this network.

The other network, called "inner network", consists of the "LAN" side of the Wireless router and any PCs connected to its LAN ports.

Both these networks are "private" networks -- they're not part of "the Internet" (Internet with a capital I), so they have to use "private" IP addresses. Because there are two networks, not one, they should use IP addresses from two different network ranges. For example, "Perimeter network" could use addresses 192.168.0.something and "inner network" could use addresses 192.168.1.something.

Your equipment suppliers (Solwise and Belkin) will have provided their equipment with factory-set IP addresses for the "LAN" sides of their equipment. It's probably easiest for us if we use the equipment with those settings if we can, although we might have to change one of them if they happen to have used addresses in the same network (because we need them to have addresses in two different networks).

So, before we go any further, it would be helpful if you would tell me what addresses are currently set for each of the network interfaces:[list=1]
  • Private-1.1: the Solwise "LAN" interface
  • Private-1.2: the Belkin "WAN" interface
  • Private-2.1: the Belkin "LAN" interface
  • Private-2.2: the IP address of any PC connected to one of the Belkin's LAN ports, and from which you will work.[/listShocked]Some additional questions:[list=a]
  • Are you able to access the Wireless router's built-in web server from your PC?
  • Are you able to access the Solwise router's built-in web server from your PC?
  • Is the Belkin the F5D6231-4 model?
  • What is the default gateway IP address on your PC? (it should be the address of the LAN interface of the Belkin Router)[/listShocked]When you respond with answers to those questions, or as many as you can manage, we can take this one step further.
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    Wireless Router

    I have a similar problem in that I am trying to install a Buffalo wireless LAN at home using / connecting through the Solwise router / ADSL modem provided by PlusNet. I want to connect two PCs and a laptop and have WLan cards for these.

    I can configure and set up the Buffalo Access Point and W/Card and can establish a wireless net. But I cannot figure out how to get the AP to connect / see / whatever the Solwise. When I try to set up the (sub-net?) all goes blank or freezes.

    I have a static IP assigned by the ISP, required to allow access to a company network. I've put every IP combination into the setup screens I can figure and have scoured the CD-Rom manuals for both the Solwise and the Buffalo. I've followed the set-up scripts by the book.

    Any ideas anyoneHuh Cry Cry Cry
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    Wireless Router

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    I have a similar problem in that I am trying to install a Buffalo wireless LAN at home using / connecting through the Solwise router / ADSL modem provided by PlusNet. I want to connect two PCs and a laptop and have WLan cards for these.


    What's the model number of the Buffalo product?
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    Wireless Router

    Buffalo WBR-B11/G54
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    Wireless Router

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    Buffalo WBR-B11/G54


    I assume that's the WBR-B11 product shown here, not the WBR-G54 shown here. (As it happens, for our purposes, I don't think the difference matters, in that they both have a single "WAN" port for connection to your Solwise router, and four "LAN" ports for connection of PCs or other hubs/switches, plus the wireless capability, of course.) But I can't find an online version of the WBR-B11 manual, so I'm having to work from the WBR-G54 manual, and will hope they're similar in essential points.

    In the manual I'm looking at, it says the Buffalo has a default LAN (not WAN) address of 192.168.11.1, and subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. Are these the settings you're using for it? If so, your PCs which connect to it should also have addresses starting 192.168.11.<something> (where <something> is not 1) and subnet mask 255.255.255.0. The default gateway for the PCs should be 192.168.11.1 (ie the address of the Buffalo). That's the easy bit, and from what you've said previously, it sounds as if you've got all that set up.

    The addresses on the "WAN" side of the Buffalo need to be co-ordinated with the addresses on the "LAN" side of the Solwise. I think the Solwise uses the address 192.168.0.1 by default as its "LAN" address, with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. Are those the values you're using?

    If they are, then the "WAN" side of the Buffalo also needs to be given a 192.168.0.<something> address with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 (select the "manual setting" option for the IP address, then, for example, you could set it to 192.168.0.2 -- actually, in the manual I'm looking at they show a value of 192.168.0.5 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, which would also be suitable.) All the PPPoE settings can be ignored.

    On the Buffalo's "Network Setup of WAN" screen, you should insert a hostname (any name which appeals to you, but which is not already used by another device) and the default gateway, which must be the LAN address of the Solwise router, which I'm assuming is 192.168.0.1. For the primary and secondary DNS values, use 212.159.13.49 and 212.159.13.50. Under "Routing" set the RIP options to "None" (these are for dynamic routing, which you don't need) and under "Address Translation" select "use". This means you'll be doing Network Address Translation twice -- once in the Buffalo, and a second time in the Solwise router. (A side-effect of this is, if you ever need to open up ports for incoming connections, you have to do so twice, once in the Solwise, pointing to the address of the Buffalo, and once in the Buffalo, pointing to the address of the PC you want to receive the incoming connection.)

    With these settings, you should be able to access the Solwise from the PCs attached to the Buffalo, either wired or wireless by browsing to 192.168.0.1. Similarly the PCs attached through the Buffalo should have Internet access.
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    I think I've got it -- Hopefully

    The model is the WBR G54 (new 54 Mbps model) and not the WBR B11. I inadvertently copied the model description from the top of the installation sheet for both models which say WBR B11 / G54. Ooops. But you have gone to the correct manual - similar to what I have on CD I suspect.

    I've spent three late evenings this week trying to set up the IP without any luck, using default settings plus my own. Nothing worked.

    The Solwise default is 192.186.7.1 but other than that I've (assumed that I) applied the settings as you suggest. I have not tried the routing RIP and NAT settings so I will try those. I HAVE PROBABLY JUST REALISED WHAT I AM DOING WRONG - thanks to your explanation. The Buffalo has to have two IP addresses of its own - one WAN-side (to talk up the stack) that is subordinate to the Solwise 192.168.7.1 and one LAN-side (to talk down the stack).

    Perhaps someone else can learn from this.

    There are two boxes in the Buffalo setup screens to enter WAN-side IPs - one for the gateway and one "IP" something or other. I entered the same value in both. When I set the gateway of the Buffalo to .... .7.1 (to point to the Solwise) and then attempt to access the Solwise setup using Internet Explorer, I get the Buffalo set up screens. When I ping both 192.168.7.1 and 192.168.11.1 light flash on the Buffalo but not on the Solwise - I appear to be connecting only to the Buffalo and not to the Solwise. This plus your explanation suggests to me that I have not assigned the 192.168.7.2 address anywhere. Even though I have written id down on paper a 1000 times. Now I concentrate, I cannot recall entering it at all.

    When setting up the Buffalo, the screens have two boxes for WAN-side IP addresses - one for the gateway and the other I am now thinking for the Buffalo itself. I think (sitting at work now, 30 miles from home PC and network) that instead of setting the WAN-side of the Buffalo to 192.168.7.2 (or .. 7.5 or 7.10 etc) I typed in 192.168.7.1 - thinking that I should be entering the IP address of the superior network device - the Solwise.

    Roll on home time, and I can try again.

    Of course there is still a possibility that the Solwise IP Routing and port controls that work has set (to allow me to log on from home with a work laptop) is part of the problem, but we'll see.

    TVM for the help. Hopefully I'll get the home PCs online again this weekend....
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    Wireless Router

    Diane: Sounds like you've worked it out!

    If the Solwise has an address of 192.168.7.1 on its LAN interface, then 192.168.7.2 is an eminently suitable address for the WAN interface of the Buffalo.

    The purpose of the "default gateway" (or simply "gateway") address is to tell a device (in this case the Buffalo router) what to do with packets for which it has no specific routing instructions. If it receives a packet with a destination address of 192.168.7.<something> then it knows exactly what to do with it: it has an interface which itself has a 192.168.7 address, so -- "by definition" -- any other 192.168.7 address must be on the same network and can be reached directly from that interface; it does not need a default route in that case. The same is true for any 192.168.11 address -- it has an interface with a 192.168.11 address which is assumed to be on the same wired (or, in this case "wireless") connection, and so can be reached directly. But in the case of any other address (eg whatever address "www.google.co.uk" corresponds to) it cannot work out for itself what to do with the packet, and the default route, or default gateway address, tells it. So, the "gateway" address has to be the LAN address of the Solwise (the LAN address, because that's the one which is "on the same wire" as the WAN interface of the Buffalo). In other words, you're telling the Buffalo: "If you can't work out what to do with the packet, send it on to the Solwise" Similarly, on the Solwise, the default route will point out across the ADSL link. And, coming back the other way, to the PCs attached to the Buffalo (either wired or wireless), their default route will be the LAN address of the Buffalo. (Telling them: "If in doubt, send to the Buffalo.")

    The only other thing is DNS -- resolving hostnames to IP addresses. If you're using the Buffalo as a DHCP server to provide configuration for any PCs attached to it (wired or wireless), it may well provide its own address (LAN side) as a DNS server (which will enable it to resolve your local hostnames to the IP addresses it's assigned to the hosts) and will (hopefully) forward other requests to the Force9 servers 212.159.13.49 and 212.159.13.50. If this doesn't happen, you may have to provide (manually) your local hosts with those last two addresses to enable them to do hostname resolution.
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    Wireless Router

    Out of curiousity, is there any advantage in having two networks at home?

    I have my Airport Basestation just bridging -- I think that's the term -- between the wired and wireless worlds, with both sides still having 192.168.1.x addresses.

    --> Stephen
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    Wireless Router

    No, that is classed as one network.

    Bridging is linking two seperate wired networks together. An example is two buildings.
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    Wireless Router

    In my own case, my Cable/DSL router gave me no choice -- it does NAT, and that's it. (It's a model that's no longer available.)

    As I was looking through the manual for the Buffalo wireless router, I could see it does have the option of switching off NAT, but as I'd spoken of double NAT in my initial reply on this thread, it seemed best to stick with it.

    I suppose it does have the advantage of added security -- someone trying to get in has to defeat both the ADSL router and the Wireless router to get at PCs connected to the router. If you put a server system in the "Perimeter network", and someone managed to compromise it, they've still got to get through the security provided by the Wireless Router to get at the PCs.
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    On air and on the web - at last

    DONE IT!!!!

    I finally stumbled through the array of techno-babble used by different manufacturers - Assigned IP = Client IP = Default IP = Airstation WAN-side IP - goodness knows what else.

    If anyone can benefit from reading our history, good luck. My system diagram works fine and the network now matches it - wading through the installation schemes and user-unfriendly manuals was the difficult thing! Why cannot the manufacturers (and manual writers) use a common set of terms instead of inventing their ownHuh??

    Thanks for the help from Force9 - we've only just left F9 to move to your sister PlusNet after work provided the ADSL service. F9 have given us years of good service and always provide excellent support (when the phones are answered....). I recommend them to everyone I meet with a bad ISP story.

    P.S. It's Peter here (not Diane herself) - setting up our network on Diane's PlusNet account. I cannot hide behind my wife's helpless girly persona - although we have both sat frustrated before the various PCs for the last three nights trying to and pooled our knowledge.
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    Wireless Router

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    No, that is classed as one network.

    Bridging is linking two seperate wired networks together. An example is two buildings.


    So what does one of these do? Do they have their terminology wrong too or am I just misunderstanding what they do?

    --> Confused of London (aka Stephen)