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This is a good problem XP/P2P

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This is a good problem XP/P2P

Ok, to keep it short and sweet when using P2P apps under XP I will suddenly lose my connection to plusnet after a while, then can't re-connect UNLESS I reboot.

Any ideas? And before you mention viri/trojans all ready checked those.
10 REPLIES
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

> Ok, to keep it short and sweet when using P2P apps under XP I will suddenly lose my connection to plusnet after a while, then can't re-connect UNLESS I reboot.
>
> Any ideas? And before you mention viri/trojans all ready checked those.


I dont think its just confined to P2p I have the same problem I am using a Zoom USb modem a 4 port powered hub and my MoBo is a gigabyte ga7ix. when I drop of the the adsl world I lose the power light sometimes on either the modem or the hub or both it has been a bit more stable after checking all my BIOS and chipset drivers were up to date but its still not right !!!! Im thinking USB 2 PCI card will cure it maybe. What kinda modem you using and what happens to the ligfhts when it does drop off Huh
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P


> I dont think its just confined to P2p I have the same problem I am using a Zoom USb modem


Remember, when you install your Zoom modem with XP, don't use the default ATM driver. Use the WAN driver. This fixed 95% of my modem problems.
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The wise man mocks the mocked, The mocked man mocks the mocker.....
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

I have the same problem. I have a PCI modem and when I lose a connection or switch my PC off at night the following day my line is down. The only way to resolve it is by un-installing my ADSL services and re-installing them. Once they are re-installed - hey presto - my line automatically connects. It's an irritant, and I'm still trying to find a solution, together with Plus.

:confused:
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

I used to have this same problem, regarding when i shut off my computer, the longer it had been off the ADSL line, the longer it took to connect next time i fired the pc up.

Sometimes it goes into training mode for a while, or the ADSL dectector just keeps flashing..
try a better driver, or instead of unistalling and reinstalling set the WAN driver to G.DMT instead of Multimode next time you fire up pc.

This worked for me, i use a D-LINK DSL-200 one of the best USB modems you will find.
The old saying "you only get what you pay for" is true, spend money on a cheap modem and you will get errors. Try the D-Link, it's expensive but you will get fast connections. (capable of 8mb speeds if they were available) the Zoom modem is probably strugling to get the 500. i have seen it, it's cheap and ugly.

You should know aswell some ISP's ADSL are set different, most focus first on high speed browsing and cache alot of webpages too, so when you think you are leaving your network to go to cnn.com for example, and you think it gets there really fast, thats b/c it is already cached on your own nwtwork and you really didn't go anywhere atal.

ISP also provide this fast bandwidth in sudden bursts.. agaim to focus on opening web pages quickly. I find as you do, if you use too much bandwidth for too long you get cut off.
i have been saying this for a long time.
and i have looked it up, please read below regarding ADSL use, it applies to some ADSL providers. i didn't write it, but it comes from Live365 (http://www.live365.com/help/studio365-live/line-quality.html) and explains why when you are connected on "P2P" programs and internet radio streaming why you slow down or lose connection. some ISP's don't like you usuing too much bandwidth for too long i'd guess. maybe BT will slap a limit on the bandwidth we can use per one day soon?.
-----------------

Line Quality Considerations

In order to get the best most consistent broadcast there are a nearly overwhelming number of variables that can effect the quality of your stream. Below is a detailed explanation which might answer the occasional complaint "Hey your stream sounds like &*$%^s!" If you are a modem user 33k is about the best upstream modem connection possible (56k modems don't help with the upstream flow of data)
The broadcast's bitrate + network overhead + any other internet use all need to add up to less than the upstream connection speed. This means it's not very likely that a 32k stream will work reliably with a 33k connection. This is why the "Output Quality" selections are somewhat less than the various connection rate settings.

This is because other computers on the internet that talk to your computer are also using up your bandwidth. If you run a web server or something like Napster and people are connecting to your system you will lose out.

(You might also get strange probes from systems just seeing what's on the internet or maybe your ISP is doing a weekly port scan of you server to see if you are running things you shouldn't - in general these shouldn't cause a problem.) Cable modems and DSL to a lesser extent can have some interesting problems.

These often allow high "bursting" speeds but if the bandwidth usage from a user remains high they start to throttle it down. Basically these ISPs want to make interactive use, like web browsing, fast - but slow down people that are trying to hog bandwidth. Modern routers can also be programmed to give priority to certain services. An ISP might decide that email and web browsing have priority over all other internet services. This could mean that at times those others services get slowed down or packets are lost but web browser still seems fast. Be careful with using web browsing as a quality gauge to network performance.

Many ISPs have caching servers that cache a lot of common web content so you might think the response back from www.nbc.com was fast, but in reality the content was sitting on your ISP's server and your request never left their network.

Some other problems that can cause intermittent headaches include ISPs performing maintenance and rebooting "routers". A router reboot could mean complete or partial network loss for a few minutes. Maintenance often results in a long period of time with no access generally at some strange hour - Sunday morning from 1 AM - 4 AM is a common outage window, but these are at the ISPs discretion. It might be a good idea to talk with the ISP to find out if that have standard outage times or have a means to preannounce them.

Dial up connection pools and broadband connections can often suffer from heavy congestion. A broadcaster might only see skipping and lost connections during peak usage hours (generally evenings) or in some shared network environments, like cable modems, a neighbor could fire off something like Napster and bring every connection around them to a slow crawl.

Sometime ISPs like to drop modem connections. Users tie up a modem for hours and either the operators reset the bank of modems or just have some sort of time out in place to try and encourage people not to monopolize modems 24 by 7. Firewalls are another source of problems. Firewalls or router filters might block certain kind of connections. Typically ISPs don't block outbound connections but it can happen especially if the operators see something as abusive or violating their usage policy.

There are some tools that can help determine if there is a network problem. The most basic is "ping". You can run ping from your DOS (or "command prompt") window. Run about a hundred or so pings to the server that you are trying to talk to during the times you are experiencing problems. See how many fail to return. This should provide a rough idea of how much packet loss there is. Zero packet loss suggests the network is fine. 2-3% loss is generally tolerable. Anymore than that and the reliability isn't there is maintain a skip free broadcast. It should be noted that sometimes servers/routers won't reply to pings so a 100% packet loss could mean the server doesn't return them or it could mean the network has a major problem like a router is down or seriously overworked (pings use ICMP packets and if a router starts to become overloaded it will start dropping ICMP packets even though other packets get through). If you see some packet loss the second step is to try and identify where the problem is.

This is really a challenge. The best thing to do is run trace route (or "tracert") to the server you are trying to talk to and see if can locate a problem. Traceroute tries to identify each router on the way to the server you want to communicate with and how much latency there is to that router. You want to look for a router that doesn't respond or has greatly varied response times.

Traceroute also uses ICMP packets so there will be routers that will never respond to traceroute, so it's a good idea to run a this while there aren't any problems giving you a good idea of what you should see to compare against the problem times.
--
Jason
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P


> The old saying "you only get what you pay for" is true, spend money on a cheap modem and you will get errors. Try the D-Link, it's expensive but you will get fast connections. (capable of 8mb speeds if they were available) the Zoom modem is probably strugling to get the 500. i have seen it, it's cheap and ugly.
>

This maybe true for the Zoom Pci, but the Zoom usb is also capable of 8mb speeds. And no, it doesnt struggle at all.

I admit i had minor probs, but after installing the WAN driver they vanished. Its fast to connect (under a second most of the time) and downloading speeds are fine, ping of 20 - 30 in CS. what more can i ask for .......
***** modem? maybe, but i don't notice the diff between mine and my friends (who has the same as you)
--
The wise man mocks the mocked, The mocked man mocks the mocker.....
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

Well heres the latest take note Technical help after installing the WAN driver (after removing the ATM driver first) my connection failed to connect everytime I tryed switching back No good still the same called Tech support after much messing about still no good problem raised to BT I then tryed some experiments and got no where eventually using system restore to go back to my previous config 2 days ago and connected first time !!!!!! Now I will try the WAN driver again if it dosent work Im taking the modem bcak and exchanging it for summmit else. I hate buying from PC world but a mate works in the shop so I get good after sales service so here we go If I can get it running with the Wan driver Ill let you know!!!
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

Ummmm.....OK

I hate to point this out but everything you said bears no realtion to my problem at all. You seem to have covered everything but what is happening. Heres a fuller description.

Untill recently this hasn't happened.
Using Kazaa, iMesh etc... after a while of downloading (seems random) my line will DROP.
I CANNOT re-establish a connection UNTILL I reboot the PC. If I don't reboot then it will just countinuously try and connect (left it for 2 hours once) with no luck.
However if I DO reboot I will connect 1st time.
I am basing this on P2P apps beacuse if I don't use any P2P apps I tend to stay connected for days normally.
Also, It's the bog standard USB Green Squid thingy, this problem never happened in the last year + only in the last few weeks.
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

In addidtion to the above, the lights don't change on the "Squid" but no connection in windows, no e-mail, no browsing, zip, zilch, zero, nadda.
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RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

> In addidtion to the above, the lights don't change on the "Squid" but no connection in windows, no e-mail, no browsing, zip, zilch, zero, nadda.

Sorry Rob We got somewhat of the point but for those of you following the saga I know have the Wan driver working It just goes to show before we go blamming BT and Plusnet make sure everything is hunky dory youre end I dont have a clue what happened when I swapped drivers the last time but logging is as the xp admin and reinstalling seemed to work so here we go lets see how many drop outs I get now Anyways to youre problem Rob I think you should look to any new software installed that may have screwed up a ddl or 2

Just a thought !!!
phobox
Grafter
Posts: 39
Registered: 31-07-2007

RE: This is a good problem XP/P2P

Hi all

I have a Dabs PCI Connexant ADSL modem in my Win2k Server machine, which is left on and connected to the Internet 24/7. The machine is a domain controller and software-based router/firewall for the LAN, so this machine is never switched off or reset unless I need to perform maintenance. The connection has never dropped unexpectedly, even when leaving P2P apps downloading overnight etc.

For those experiencing a problem, I would suggest the main cause is drivers more than anything else. From experience, I have noticed that ADSL modem drivers can be very picky when it comes to working flawlessly. For example, while my server is left on 24/7 and has been running happily for about a month now, it has once had a blue screen because of the modem driver. So keep playing with drivers is my suggestion Smiley

Also if you have the means, try the modem with a different machine and see if the same problem happens. Could be the setup of an individual machine causing it.

Rob