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SAR110 and Static IP's

N/A

SAR110 and Static IP's

Sorry if this has been asked before but despite searching I haven't found a definitive answer.

Just taken delivery of starter pack with the SAR110 and connected with no problems, however I want to use the spare IP number that has been allocated to me but see no easy way of assigning it to my 2nd pc (or laptop in this case) as the PPP interface takes the first of the two IP numbers meaning that I would have to assign the 'spare' to the routers ethernet port.

E.G.

range xxx.xxx.xxx.212 to xxx.xxx.xxx.215
routers PPP interface gets xxx.xxx.xxx.213
leaving spare of xxx.xxx.xxx.214
routers ethernet port on the default 192.168.7.1
PC on 192.168.7.2 connected via hub

It seems to me that to add the xxx.xxx.xxx.214 address to my laptop and plug it into the hub would not work as there is no route thru to the net that way, I would have to assign the 214 address to the routers ethernet port first, leaving no ip's for my laptop. The 213 address gets assigned automatically by PlusNet so see no way around it other then buying a adsl hub.

Have I got this right, is the router and IP config no good for what I want or have I just lost the plot somewhere?

Cheers


3 REPLIES
N/A

RE: SAR110 and Static IP's

Two ways to do this, either:

Switch off NAT which effectively places the router into bridge mode with the effect that your IP's get passed through to your PC's - only works if you have enough IP addresses for all PC's that you want to connect to the internet. This can also cause problems with networking to any other "non-internet enabled PC's" unless you are able to dual home the network cards. A number of people use this approach with ISP's like Zen where they have an 8 IP block (5 useable) assigned.

Use a NAT BIMAP rule to create a 1:1 mapping between the spare external IP address and the internal IP address of the machine that you wish to associate it with. This is the more common approach where you want to use NAPT to share one external IP with a set of internal machines (and gain some of the 'firewall' benefits of NAT operation), whilst having certain machines that are assigned a direct link to allow things like local hosting of Web servers, etc.

The main issue with the BIMAP rule is that it doesn't cater for those applications which embed the Machines local IP into the data packet - typically H.323 apps like Messenger.
N/A

RE: SAR110 and Static IP's

Hi,

The BIMAP is what came up with as well, tried turning NAT off but still seemed to have to assign a IP number to the internal ethernet port, which meant that all my numbers would be taken I think.

Anyway cheers for the reply

> Two ways to do this, either:
>
> Switch off NAT which effectively places the router into bridge mode with the effect that your IP's get passed through to your PC's - only works if you have enough IP addresses for all PC's that you want to connect to the internet. This can also cause problems with networking to any other "non-internet enabled PC's" unless you are able to dual home the network cards. A number of people use this approach with ISP's like Zen where they have an 8 IP block (5 useable) assigned.
>
> Use a NAT BIMAP rule to create a 1:1 mapping between the spare external IP address and the internal IP address of the machine that you wish to associate it with. This is the more common approach where you want to use NAPT to share one external IP with a set of internal machines (and gain some of the 'firewall' benefits of NAT operation), whilst having certain machines that are assigned a direct link to allow things like local hosting of Web servers, etc.
>
> The main issue with the BIMAP rule is that it doesn't cater for those applications which embed the Machines local IP into the data packet - typically H.323 apps like Messenger.

N/A

RE: SAR110 and Static IP's


BIMAP works sort of, but this is still using NAT. To make BIMAP work the server I want to have the external address must be configured with an address on the internal network, not the external ip address.

Does anyone know how to make the 110 work without assigning an internal IP address?



> Hi,
>
> The BIMAP is what came up with as well, tried turning NAT off but still seemed to have to assign a IP number to the internal ethernet port, which meant that all my numbers would be taken I think.
>
> Anyway cheers for the reply
>
> > Two ways to do this, either:
> >
> > Switch off NAT which effectively places the router into bridge mode with the effect that your IP's get passed through to your PC's - only works if you have enough IP addresses for all PC's that you want to connect to the internet. This can also cause problems with networking to any other "non-internet enabled PC's" unless you are able to dual home the network cards. A number of people use this approach with ISP's like Zen where they have an 8 IP block (5 useable) assigned.
> >
> > Use a NAT BIMAP rule to create a 1:1 mapping between the spare external IP address and the internal IP address of the machine that you wish to associate it with. This is the more common approach where you want to use NAPT to share one external IP with a set of internal machines (and gain some of the 'firewall' benefits of NAT operation), whilst having certain machines that are assigned a direct link to allow things like local hosting of Web servers, etc.
> >
> > The main issue with the BIMAP rule is that it doesn't cater for those applications which embed the Machines local IP into the data packet - typically H.323 apps like Messenger.
>
>