cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Routers and Operating systems.

Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

Routers and Operating systems.

I work in a shop, part of a large electronics chain. One of the products we sell are routers, both wired and wireless.
As with any shop we try our best to avoid refunds.
I continously have customers being refered to me insisting that the router they purchased does not work with their operating system or they have a mac or whatever. Of course they all have a friend or cousin who is a computer engineer and has told them this, yeah right!
I would just like 100% confirmation that this is absolute rubbish as through my own experience I am 99.99% sure. As far as I am aware when the web based configuration is used and not any supplied discs and the router is connected either wirelessly or with an ethernet cable the operating system is not important. It is only a gateway. On my own network I am on my third brand of router (settled with Netgear)and I have, and have had Windows XP, 98, Vista for a short time, Fedora, a Playstation 3, a Dlink DSM 320 Media player and an Orange SPV M600 PDA and none of the above could care less about what router I was using. But yes I know that the customer is always right (apart from the 9 out of 10 times when they are wrong!)
4 REPLIES
p_w_d_stone
Grafter
Posts: 315
Registered: 05-04-2007

Routers and Operating systems.

When connected using standardised protocols like ethernet and wireless all routers should be compatible with all operating systems and hardware.

Routers are typically maintained using a web interface that should be compatible with all javascript enabled browsers.

What the "engineers" may mean is that the software disc that comes with many routers to ease configuration will not work on non Windows operating systems. The router is perfectly functional without using this though, provided you have the wit to read the instruction manual.
Community Veteran
Posts: 14,469
Registered: 30-07-2007

Routers and Operating systems.

Ethernet based routers are OS independent as the setup is within the unit itself. However, there are several things within Windows and outside that can cause issues:

1) Network card set to a static IP / maually configured rather than set to auto / get IP & DNS via DHCP.
2) on-board Lan disabled in BIOS or incorrect drivers loaded for it.
3) A software firewall 'getting in the way' - probably the frinds 'IT expoert' set it up previously!
4) 'Operator error' - basically a numpty not really knowing what to do.
5) System set-up to still use the dialup modem that may have previously been used.
6) As 5 but due to a previous USB modem driver still installed

Even if all the above does not apply you have

7) Sometimes the router really is broken!
8) Bad house wiring
9) Incorrect use of filters - filter into filyer into router etc.
10) Failing to filter all phones, faxes, modems, alarm systems
11) Local interference - like Xmas lights, crackle on the line.
12) Low quality ADSL signal meaning the router does not sync
13) Another numpty no knowing how to connect it all up physically
13) The friends 'IT expert' being another numpty and trying to save face by saying its the router not them!

Not easy to dismiss all that while talking to the customer who is insistent that the hardware does not work 'cus his friend says so.
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

Routers and Operating systems.

Yeah, that it what I was saying in the previous post and the reason I tell customers when buying routers not to use any supplied discs. Maybe I should just remove the discs when we get the products into stock. LoL
Community Veteran
Posts: 1,236
Registered: 02-08-2007

Routers and Operating systems.

I think the numpty theory is true most of the time. I personally test all the "faulty" items returned to the store (not just routers) and I would say at least 95% of them work perfectly!