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My Experience Might Be Useful

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My Experience Might Be Useful

I recently bought a PC with an Athlon 2000 CPU which should run at 1.6 GHZ. I noticed it was showing as an Athlon 1250 when I rebooted . I checked the BIOS and it showed I had an Athlon 2000 at a frequency of 133 MHz which is what it should be . I used a programme called WNCPUID from
http://www.h-oda.com/
which told me the CPU was running slow at 1244.45/100FSB . On advice I went in to the BIOS,changed the CPU to a 1250 ,saved and then rebooted,went back in ,changed it back to a 2000,then saved again .
When I rebooted, the startup screen now showed that I had an Athlon 2000 and WNCPUID then showed it was running at 1.6GHz/133MHZ as it should be.
You might find this programme useful.
Stuart
4 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 6,983
Thanks: 8
Registered: 10-04-2007

RE: My Experience Might Be Useful

> I recently bought a PC with an Athlon 2000 CPU which should run at 1.6 GHZ. I noticed it was showing as an Athlon 1250 when I rebooted . I checked the BIOS and it showed I had an Athlon 2000 at a frequency of 133 MHz which is what it should be . I used a programme called WNCPUID from
> http://www.h-oda.com/
> which told me the CPU was running slow at 1244.45/100FSB . On advice I went in to the BIOS,changed the CPU to a 1250 ,saved and then rebooted,went back in ,changed it back to a 2000,then saved again .
> When I rebooted, the startup screen now showed that I had an Athlon 2000 and WNCPUID then showed it was running at 1.6GHz/133MHZ as it should be.
> You might find this programme useful.
> Stuart


It is a feature with some of the "Athlon" motherboards that the first time they detect the CPU they fire up and remember the settings as a so called "Safe" mode.
Unless you do actulay go into the bios and tell it what it should be running as it will stay like this forever.
It may be that for some reason your bios has been reset or has even reset itself which would cause this problem.
You should be able to see the speed at which your PC is running if you watch for the info that is displyed on the monitor when you boot up.

John
N/A

RE: My Experience Might Be Useful

I think I know what happened.
If you reset the machine while it is doing the
Power On Self Test (POST) the machine thinks
that the last POST did not complete successfully
and loads the Bios "safe values".
There should be a set of settings called "optimized"
these will set the system to run at full speed.

> It is a feature with some of the "Athlon" motherboards that the first time they detect the CPU they fire up and remember the settings as a so called "Safe" mode.
> Unless you do actulay go into the bios and tell it what it should be running as it will stay like this forever.
> It may be that for some reason your bios has been reset or has even reset itself which would cause this problem.
> You should be able to see the speed at which your PC is running if you watch for the info that is displyed on the monitor when you boot up.
>
> John
N/A

RE: My Experience Might Be Useful

> I think I know what happened.
> If you reset the machine while it is doing the
> Power On Self Test (POST) the machine thinks
> that the last POST did not complete successfully
> and loads the Bios "safe values".
> There should be a set of settings called "optimized"
> these will set the system to run at full speed.
>

I think you could well be right John-there was an occasion when I rebooted before it had completed the previous restart so maybe that IS what happened .
cheers
Stuart
N/A

RE: My Experience Might Be Useful

This is a pretty common occurrence with Athlon CPUs and motherboards (I build PCs for fun and profit as well as working as an I.T support technician in the F.E sector) - all Socket A boards can run both Athlon (133MHz Front Side Bus speed) and Duron (100MHz FSB) chips; the FSB is usually set to the slower setting by default so that anyone fitting the slower Duron will not damage it by running it at a FSB setting above it's specification. Altering the FSB (and hence the CPU speed - it has to run in a set multiple number of the FSB speed) is a fairly simple operation carried out in the PC's BIOS (accessed at startup by pressing the Del key). What further complicates matters is that the AthlonXP chips don't actually run at the rated speed mentioned in the ads e.g an XP2000+ actually runs at 1.67GHz - the 2000+ figure is a comparison to a mythical non-XP Athlon equivalent (if you can understand that Smiley ).

GM