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Basic router Specifications Question

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Basic router Specifications Question

When it comes to router specifications what significance does the fact that a router is 10/100Base-T play?.Is it the speed the router communicates with the computer, or does it determine the maximum speed that you can have as a broadband connection

The reason for my asking is that both of the computers have RJ-45 ethernet sockets that are rated 10/100/1000Base-T,and I am hoping to get a 2MB connection when ADSL finally arrives here in a couple of months time.

Sorry for the rather basic question,and have looked at the advice in the turorial and FAQ forum under choosing equipment,and am left wondering if for a 2MB connection I need a different type of router than are suggested there.

Ian & Linda Jordan
3 REPLIES
Mark_Dowd
Grafter
Posts: 102
Registered: 08-08-2007

Basic router Specifications Question

This is the speed of your LAN-side connection. It does not have any bearing on the speed of your ADSL connection, usually 512k, 1M or 2M.
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Basic router Specifications Question

The answers are "Yes" to your first couple of questions and "No" to the last one.

Is it the speed at which the router communicates with the Computer? Yes. The 10/100 indicates that it can operate at either 10Mbps or 100Mbps. Most ADSL routers now have switches rather than hubs, which has several advantages: firstly, they separate sending and receiving, so devices can do both at once (full duplex); therefore they're really 2 x 10Mbps or 2 x 100Mbps. Secondly, they segregate attached equipment into separate "collision domains" and autosense the correct speed for the particular device (10Mbps or 100Mbps); in this way if you have a mixture of devices, some of which can manage just 10Mbps and others can manage 100Mbps, they are not all dragged down to the speed of the slowest (10Mbps) which is what happens with a hub. Two PCs fitted with 100Mbps cards will be able to talk to one another at 100Mbps (or 200Mbps in full duplex).

Does it determine the maximum speed you can have as a broadband connection? Yes. If someone invented some super-fast xDSL, then the speed of your connection between the router and your PCs would limit how much use you could make of that speed. However, that day is not with us yet and a 2 x 10Mbps or 2 x 100Mbps connection is not the limiting factor on the 2Mbps downstream / 256kbps upstream ADSL connection you're thinking of. (So you can take that "Yes" as a "No" under present circumstances!)

Do you need a different type of router than those suggested in the Tutorials and FAQs? No. Make sure you buy one with a "switch" rather than a hub, and ensure it says 10/100Mbps, autosensing. Which is as good as taken for granted these days.
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Basic router Specifications Question

Thanks folks for the excellent explainations.All my questions answered and just a matter of waiting for BT to do their thing down at the exchange.

The help is appreciated

Ian & Linda Jordan