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Basic Networking on ADSL

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Basic Networking on ADSL

:shock:

Just ordered ADSL and the router pack, I want to network 3 pc's and a network printer without a server.

How do I set up the IP addresses on the PC's and printer so that anyone can access broadband and the printer?

I realise that I need a hub/switch as the provided router only has one ethernet port.

Do I just assign IP addresses in the same range as the router wth the same subnet mask and then point the default gateway settings to the router?

All PC's are running XP and have LAN capability, the printer is not a major issue but it would be nice to get it set up too.

Cheers, Jim.
7 REPLIES
Community Veteran
Posts: 3,789
Registered: 08-06-2007

Re: Basic Networking on ADSL

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Do I just assign IP addresses in the same range as the router wth the same subnet mask and then point the default gateway settings to the router?


Yes, I'd assume thet your router will probably be assigned a private Class C Network address, (probably 192.168.0.1), so simply assign your machines ip addresses from 192.168.0.2 - 192.168.0.4

Your printer should be connected to one of the machines - simply 'share' it (by right clicking) and, assuming all the XP machines are in the same "windows domain" then you should be able to 'Add new printer > Network" and follow the prompts.

Barry
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Re: Basic Networking on ADSL

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I realise that I need a hub/switch as the provided router only has one ethernet port.


Hmm that's interesting,I am awaiting my router starter pack,but I need 2 ethernet ports.Now silly question time.I do have a Draytek Vigor 2200x(with 4 ethernet ports) that is labeled as "Broadband Router/Switch" that I use to connect my "Mac" to my Home Highway socket,but according to the manual is not suitable for plugging directly into an ADSL socket,is there any possability that this can be utilised between the computers and the supplied router to connect 2 ethernet equiped computers to the ADSL socket.?

Ian Jordan
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Basic Networking on ADSL

the Draytek should work ok as a switch but you may need to connect the router to the switch with a crossover cable or there may be a uplink on the switch. You may just get away pluging it in.
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Basic Networking on ADSL

You should be able to use your Vigor 2200 with the ADSL router.

I assume you're relinquishing your Home Highway connection? In which case you can connect the LAN socket of your ADSL router to the WAN socket of the Vigor, giving you 4 LAN ports on the Vigor for connection to PCs or other devices. This kind of setup has been discussed several times in this forum. See, for example, Separate Netgear ADSL Modem and Router Port Forwarding (which itself points to two other similar threads).
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Basic Networking on ADSL

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or there may be a uplink on the switch. You may just get away pluging it in.


Yes there is an uplink,but I am now very interested in what it actually does.Since you mentioned an uplink I decided to have a look to see if the 2200x had one,and yes it did but I had the ethernet lead from the computer plugged into it and thing have been working ok for the period of time I have had the equipment (approx 3 months).Upon unplugging the eternet cable from the uplink socket and inserting it into one of the 4 other ethernet sockets to see what happened everything is still apparently working ok.So what it actually does is beyond me,but do I assume from the fact that you have mentioned the uplink that it will be somehow involved in connecting the 2200x to the Plusnet supplied router?
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Basic Networking on ADSL

Obviously, for a connection to work, the "receive" of one device has to be connected to the "transmit" of the other. The normal connection cable is a "straight-through" type in which the lead connected to pin 1 of the plug at one end is connected to pin 1 at the plug at the other end, and so on for all 8 contacts. In other words, the normal straight-through cable makes no account for ensuring a "transmit" at one end goes to a "receive" at the other, so, therefore, it's necessary for the sockets on certain devices to be wired to achieve the necessary crossover. Hubs, switches and routers use these "crossover" sockets as their normal sockets, which means you can use a standard straight-through cable to connect between the socket on a PC's network adapter and the socket on a hub, switch or router.

However, if you want to connect a hub/switch/router to another hub/switch/router, then a straight-through cable won't work, unless one of the devices has an uplink port (in which the connections are wired in the same way as on a PC's network card). If there's no uplink port, a "crossover" cable has to be used instead of a "straight-through" type. Many switches and routers now sense the correct setting required on each port and configure themselves correctly, so you don't have to worry about which sort of cable you're using -- the device adjusts accordingly. Judging from the fact that your Vigor worked regardless of whether the lead was in the "uplink" port or another port it would seem that, at the very least, the uplink port works this way.

"mwright's" suggestion (if I understood it correctly) was that, when you get it, you connect the ADSL router to one of the "LAN" ports on the Vigor, not the "WAN" port (which would be the conventional way of doing it); thereby using the Vigor simply as a (rather expensive) switch. This is certainly an option, and it makes your setup simple, but you'll be throwing away virtually all the functionality for which you've paid. The Vigor will not then be providing you with any firewalling, for example.
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Basic Networking on ADSL

Thanks taskforce9

For the very consise and informative reply.I am afraid I was somewhat thrown in at the deep end when it came to the subject of routers and switchs,The 2200x was bought in a somewhat state of panic in that I had a G4 Mac on the way and no apparent way of connecting it to my Home Highway setup .A search of the web failed to turn up a simple PCI card ala Windows Box to do the job,so the Vigor was chosen.The situation of course would have been academic,and I think pretty simple, had the original poster had not pointed out that the supplied router only had one ehernet port,which posed me yet more vexing problems :-)

So it should be simple now,all I have to do is get my Mac to talk to the vigor which I have achieved the; get the Vigor to talk to the supplied router,and the whole lot to talk to the outside world,then gat my wifes Windows XP machine to join in the conversation............. easy:I feel a lot of grey hairs coming on :-),and a wife constantly saying "done it yet so I can check my e-mails?"

I have been busy printing out all the replies in this thread,as I feel that they are going to be very useful indeed,and rest assured they are appreciated

Ian Jordan