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4KB/s is 'Fair Usa"?

elton
Grafter
Posts: 175
Registered: 30-07-2007

4KB/s is 'Fair Usa"?

I just looked at some fairly recent emails from PlusNet regarding my peak-time usage, and I see that I exceeded my monthly peak-time usage allowance of 12.5GB on a number of occasions.

A quick calculation reveals that 12.5GB/month (31 days) equates to an average of 4.667KB/s over the course of a month. This is less than I'd get on dial-up.

With just a 2MB connection I could theoretically download 669.6 GB/month, yet the allowance is less than 2% of this.

Can PlusNet please tell me, under what interpretation of the word 'fair', does this constitute "fair usage" of a supposed 'up to' 8MB connection?
4 REPLIES
Plusnet Staff
Plusnet Staff
Posts: 12,169
Thanks: 18
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-04-2007

4KB/s is 'Fair Usa"?

Hi,

When you buy a broadband service you are buying that access on a shared contended network, you aren't buying a 1:1 service that will provide and guarantee full and constant downloads speeds at 2Mbps.

The bandwidth we buy costs £1.75m per year per 622Mbps pipe, that means that to provide a customer with 2Mbps of bandwidth across that central pipe would cost around £420 per month. Broadband Premier contributes less than £8.40 per month to bandwidth costs (i.e. less than 2% of the cost of providing a constant 2Mbps service).

That's the fair part, the account provides the amount of bandwidth that you pay for.
elton
Grafter
Posts: 175
Registered: 30-07-2007

4KB/s is 'Fair Usa"?

Hello Mr Tomlinson,

thank you for your reply, however much of it is irrelevant to my query. I feel I have been mislead by your (PlusNet's) sales pitch, and by your responses to the many user queries regarding the performance of your "product".

I am bewildered that this could have occurred, since I have a fairly recent BSc. (hons.) degree in Computer Science from a top university, and also 30 years work experience in IT.

Clearly I will have to give this matter further deliberation and investigation in order to ascertain the cause of my misunderstanding, before commencing an appropriate course of action.

Regards,
Steve
Plusnet Staff
Plusnet Staff
Posts: 12,169
Thanks: 18
Fixes: 1
Registered: 04-04-2007

4KB/s is 'Fair Usa"?

I'm curious to what you think you've been misled by, we don't anywhere say that you'd be able to use 600GB in a month and that the service is based around the fact that the capacity available is shared and has to be shared in a fair way comensurate with the contribution from the subscription payment to the bandwidth.
elton
Grafter
Posts: 175
Registered: 30-07-2007

4KB/s is 'Fair Usa"?

Quote
I'm curious to what you think you've been misled by, we don't anywhere say that you'd be able to use 600GB in a month and that the service is based around the fact that the capacity available is shared and has to be shared in a fair way comensurate with the contribution from the subscription payment to the bandwidth.


As I said initially, "With just a 2MB connection I could theoretically download 669.6 GB/month, yet the allowance is less than 2% of this."

When I signed the contract with you 5 years ago, the term "contention" was applied. This rule, as I understand the matter, no longer applies. And this rule would not restrict my download bandwidth to anything close to that imposed by the current restrictions. This is what I find misleading. Is there any other way to describe it?

What benefit does "Up to 8Mb/s" offer the customer over 512Kb/s from the customer's perspective? I would argue strongly that if offers little or no benefit whatsoever, given the monthly download limit. If trumpeting "up to 8Mb/s" as a benefit, without equally highlighting the download restrictions, I would argue is misleading.

The concept of "sharing the bandwidth in a fair way", as you apply it, is wholly irrelevant to the customer. It never ceases to annoy me that you use the term in the way that a famine relief team might use it when distributing food rations. It is entirely meaningless to the customer.