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1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

« on 02/03/2010, 20:02 »
Scientists are lobbying for a new word to help them describe numbers larger than 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

http://www.telegraph.co.u...00000000000000000000.html

anyone any ideas


 
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  • M Steve
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« Reply #1 on 02/03/2010, 21:41 »
Howz about oooooooooooootyphoooooooo Grin
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« Reply #2 on 02/03/2010, 21:44 »
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« Reply #3 on 02/03/2010, 22:06 »
I like the one in the link  thats one HELA of a number
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« Reply #4 on 02/03/2010, 22:30 »
Love this quote:

"At the moment we are focusing on more pressing issues, such as redefining the weight of the kilogram. "

I'm going to take a rough non-science approach and state that I'm 100% sure it weighs....... 1 kilogram?  Are scientists mad?  Why would they need to redefine the weight of a kilogram, it's exactly as it says it is, 1kg!

Not sure I'd agree with a "hella" though, apart from being a hella' big number, it's slang, it needs to be scientific, I'd suggest a Bing, after all, MS would pay for it, even if it isn't as high as a googoplex.
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  • Be3G
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« Reply #5 on 02/03/2010, 23:19 »
Hmm, seems that poor wording on the part of the Telegraph is causing some confusion here. Scientists are not looking for a word for 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (more easily written as 1027), as we/they already have a word for that – an octillion. What they are, however, looking for is an SI prefix that means 1027 lots of something, in the same way that ‘1kg’ means ‘1000 lots of 1g’.

As for redefining the weight of 1kg, well, there could be a perfectly plausible explanation for that, if the person quoted in the article was talking scientifically rather than colloquially. You see, in day-to-day life we say that things ‘weigh’ a certain number of grammes or kilogrammes, but in fact we're not describing their weight at all – we're describing their mass. Thus, technically speaking the weight of 1kg is actually 9.81 newtons.
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« Reply #6 on 03/03/2010, 02:26 »
I'm going to take a rough non-science approach and state that I'm 100% sure it weighs....... 1 kilogram?  Are scientists mad?  Why would they need to redefine the weight of a kilogram, it's exactly as it says it is, 1kg!

Wikipedia explains the problem.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogramme
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« Reply #7 on 03/03/2010, 08:15 »
Scientists are lobbying for a new word to help them describe numbers larger than 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000

http://www.telegraph.co.u...00000000000000000000.html

anyone any ideas


 


A "shedload"?
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« Reply #8 on 03/03/2010, 08:46 »
why stop there?  in a few years they'll find they've inflated to the next necessary 'big number' requirement, just like money.
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« Reply #9 on 03/03/2010, 08:54 »
It's all relative Cool
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« Reply #10 on 03/03/2010, 08:57 »
So's my Granny!   Grin
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« Reply #11 on 03/03/2010, 09:00 »
Whereas distance is defined in reference to the speed of light, and is therefore the same everywhere (although i heard last year that scientists are concerned that the speed of light appears to be dropping!), and capacity (litres etc) are defined in reference to distance.  The Kg is still defined using a physical standard, which can obviously only be in one place (the basement of the louvre, which is legally in no country apparently).  It's therefore subject to change, no matter how carefully it's looked after, and is always in danger of being damaged or destroyed (by accident or design). They need to find some way of defining it, that doesn't relate to a specific lump of metal.

John
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« Reply #12 on 03/03/2010, 09:03 »
What they are, however, looking for is an SI prefix that means 1027 lots of something, in the same way that ‘1kg’ means ‘1000 lots of 1g’.
Do you mean that they are looking  for a 'letter or letters'?........ like 'k' stands for 1000 times?
Maybe the letter should  be from latin.
what that should be I am not sure ........except that the latin for 27 is viginti septem...... maybe transferred as 'vs' which could be spoken as 'veesep' or'veesepo' when followed by a consonant. Undecided

(My latin teacher would be proud of me for that!) Wink
always  switch on  brain before opening  mouth !
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« Reply #13 on 03/03/2010, 09:15 »
That's it! k=1000, so the answer is kkkkkkkkkilo. Say that quickly!
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« Reply #14 on 03/03/2010, 09:48 »
its not that many years ago that they redefined the inch to be exactly 25.4 mm, it used to be 25.399 something
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« Reply #15 on 03/03/2010, 12:24 »
The Guiness Book of Records used to have an entry for the most accurate definition of Ω (Pi) That ran to a published heavy weight tome of hundreds of pages and thousands of digits. That was some time ago, I believe using some of the worlds most powerful computers that has long since been surpassed.
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