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Disabled win xp GUI; How can I enable vgasave?

  • thefrostfamily
  • Guest
« on 01/03/2005, 22:27 »
While installing a new graphics card, I disabled my previous graphics adapter (Intel 82845GL) and Windows XP defaulted to vgasave to display the screen. When I hit upon a problem with the card which meant I could not install it, I thought that disabling vgasave would cause windows would revert to the Intel controller. However, I now know that vgasave is a fall-back service and without it windows would not be able to display the GUI.

So now I have a perfectly functiong OS, but it cannot show the GUI, for I have accidentally displayed the service which shows it. After a little research on the internet, I used the Recovery Console to enable the service again by typing:

enable vgasave SERVICE_SYSTEM_START

which should have restarted the service and restored my GUI. However, I was greeted with the message:

Registry entry for vgasave has been found. Its value is already SERVICE_SYSTEM_START (or words to that effect)

So I now tried to copy the files for vgasave from my win xp setup disk to my hard disk. They copied successfully, and I rebooted, but no GUI.

Does anyone have any ideas for what to do next?
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  • cyteck
  • Guest
« Reply #1 on 01/03/2005, 23:23 »
Hello,

Have you tried pressing F8 immediately after the bios information is shown at POST (start up) this should give the emergency options and you should be offered a VGA MODE option from this menu. You could also try from the same F8 menu selecting the "Last Known Good" which can restore the last saved working version of your registry. Yet another option from the F8 menu might be loading XP but in safe mode this doesnt load all devices or services just the bare bones OS and system services.

**Sometimes one can try to be abit to clever for one's own good with windows XP in this kind of situation.

**If you fail to solve the problem with any of the above options then I wouldnt waste any more time fannying around with Windows just crack on and re-install the whole thing again, Yes! this might seem like a total pain in the proverbal but from past expeience this is often far quicker and often much more successful.

**Why didnt you just install (physically install) the new graphics card and let XP do its own auto-detect hardware process. Let XP sort out any conflicts it finds, it will tell you if there are any serious problamatic conflicts that will halt the OS.

**Leave all the system services well alone unless you FULLY understand what they are or what they actually do and the implications of making any changes to them.

**Leave the registry well alone too again until or unless you have been taught how and why too edit or alter registry values. I say this from bitter experience and from knowing just how easy it can be to completely mess up an entire system. If in any doubte LEAVE THE REGISTRY ALONE.

**Windows XP is more resilent than you might think given half a chance it will try and put itself to rights.

Ivan  Smiley
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  • mattley
  • Guest
« Reply #2 on 02/03/2005, 19:44 »
Quote

So now I have a perfectly functiong OS, but it cannot show the GUI,



Given the level of integration between the OS and GUI I'd say perfectly functional was pushing it;)

Quote
for I have accidentally displayed the service which shows it. After a little research on the internet, I used the Recovery Console to enable the service again by typing:

enable vgasave SERVICE_SYSTEM_START

which should have restarted the service and restored my GUI. However, I was greeted with the message:

Registry entry for vgasave has been found. Its value is already SERVICE_SYSTEM_START (or words to that effect)

So I now tried to copy the files for vgasave from my win xp setup disk to my hard disk. They copied successfully, and I rebooted, but no GUI.

Does anyone have any ideas for what to do next?


You're in a world of hurt.

Sorry to seem a little downbeat, but really, that Installation looks really screwed.

as cyteck says, It's time to crack on and rebuild from scratch.

*Hint* Should you for some bizarre reason find that, upon review, your rigourous backup regeime is starting to look less that adequate. Only if like.

Install a new instance of windows into a directory called windows2 using a different username. This will give you bootable environment from which you can recover everything from your old profile before formatting and doing it properly.
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  • cyteck
  • Guest
« Reply #3 on 02/03/2005, 23:01 »
Hello again,

Basically if you dont have the XP GUI then you DONT have a functional OS at all for the precise reasons already stated by Matley, the GUI & OS are inter-woven. So if the windowsXP SHELL  is not working or present i.e. windows explorer (no! not internet explorer but windows explorer) is damaged the the core of windows is also damaged which can only mean one thing re-installation to repair.

**No! dont attempt to re-install a second copy of windowsXP into a different directory on the same disk this is fraught with problems and is often a recipe for yet further disasters. I'm NOT a fan of this appoach at all. I stick firmly to what I said previously run a completely fresh installation of windows XP and let setup reformat your HDD and delete the old exsisting primary system partition, if setup says all files will be lost thats fine let setup do this. let setup create a new primary parition once again from scratch. This way you know that ALL the files for XP will be loaded correctly into the right locations and all should function as required by the end of the process.

**If you re-install into a second directory setup might end up getting confused as to where certain files need to go and I wouldnt trust the end result's to work correctly.

*If you stick to a complete system rebuild you can be completely sure that end result will be a sound working version of XP GUI and all.

Ivan
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  • mattley
  • Guest
« Reply #4 on 03/03/2005, 11:50 »
Quote


**No! dont attempt to re-install a second copy of windowsXP into a different directory on the same disk this is fraught with problems and is often a recipe for yet further disasters.


If you read it all Wink

Quote
This will give you bootable environment from which you can recover everything from your old profile before formatting and doing it properly.


I agree with you completely that this is not an acceptable solution for proper operation of any machine, It does however enable one to burn everything onto CD prior to reformatting should that be necessary.
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  • cyteck
  • Guest
« Reply #5 on 03/03/2005, 16:16 »
Hi matley,

OOP's your right sorry I wasnt having a go at you and I take the point your making entirely. Its just that I have seen and know from bitter experience that any attempts to repair a damaged windowsXP installation can be like digging yourself into a deeper hole.

Yes! some very experienced & clever IT professionals can indeed repair windows in certain situations but they tend to know exactly which precise files are missing or corrupted and exactly what they do and where they are located. Yes! I have seen windows repaired successfully in this way but its a pretty rare  thing as far as I can see. For most of us mear mortals its faster & better to just start from scratch and fresh install.

Ivan
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  • mattley
  • Guest
« Reply #6 on 03/03/2005, 19:08 »
Quote
OOP's your right sorry I wasnt having a go at you


Never thought you were:)

Quote
any attempts to repair a damaged windowsXP installation can be like digging yourself into a deeper hole.


Absolutely.

Quote
For most of us mear mortals its faster & better to just start from scratch and fresh install.


I've too have seen senior engineers do some frightening things to servers in order to 'repair' them but not me. I'm a back to backup man through and through.

the second directory trick has saved a few clients data sets though, as we both agree, is a recovery solution nothing more.

As a side note, I've seen several high end servers set up with a two OS es installed from scratch in case of OS corruption. Obviously the redundent OS never gets patched or updated, but it's a pretty good idea IMO.
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  • cyteck
  • Guest
« Reply #7 on 03/03/2005, 22:25 »
Hi again,

Yep! I used to work for a small ISP and website design company and we used to hosted some very expensive client websites on a very impressive high end HP server. The server in question had redundant everything, redundant memory, redundant fans x4, redundant power supply units x4, x4 CPU's, and HOT SWAP hard drives x24 (using a RAID array with Raid 5) so the OS could rebuild itself if required in the case of a failure. If a HDD failed we just pulled it out of the rack and popped in a new one and away it went. Awesome stuff and at an awesome price too, I think the server in question cost in the order of 50K.

I think the thing that suprised me the most though about this server was it wasnt that fast considering it had so much power but on the other hand it could cope with massive amounts of inbound connections & site visitors on an hourly basis. We used to host a well known site called "this is money" as it had been written bye a couple of people I used to work with before the site was moved down to London and ANM.

Ivan  Cool
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  • mattley
  • Guest
« Reply #8 on 03/03/2005, 22:49 »
Proper Kit Smiley

A couple of my clients run at this scale, and though impressive, downtime always seem to find a way upstream, if ya know what I mean.....


.... and I know you do.

 Cheesy
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  • thefrostfamily
  • Guest
« Reply #9 on 04/03/2005, 17:40 »
Hello,

Thanks for those suggestions. I am close to admitting defeat and re-installing the lot, but I only used the recovery console as a last resort. I had already tried the ususal options, safe mode, enable vga mode, last known good...So the recovery console was a definite last resort. As I have said, It hasn't worked so the only path open now is to reinstall windows.

Thanks anyway! Smiley
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  • cyteck
  • Guest
« Reply #10 on 04/03/2005, 18:42 »
Hello again,

The recovery console I think is abit of a let down really the only people who can make full use of this tool are extremely advanced users or senior systems administrators or programmers. The recovery console requires advanced command line knowledge to best use it, its used for changing things like security descriptors or changing the way specific services interact or changing user options. But its very user unfriendly and its tricky to use and I never really got to grips with it at all. Dont like it and didnt find it of much practical value personally.

Ivan  :roll:
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  • mattley
  • Guest
« Reply #11 on 04/03/2005, 20:07 »
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The recovery console I think is abit of a let down really


Yes. Yes it is.

Quote
the only people who can make full use of this tool are extremely advanced users or senior systems administrators or programmers.


I'm an extremely advanced user, a systems adminstrator and a programmer and I Dont like it and didnt find it of much practical value personally. either

 Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
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  • cyteck
  • Guest
« Reply #12 on 04/03/2005, 22:13 »
Hi Matley,

Well, there you go that proves my point I think?? Yet another MS un-user friendly peice of software :lol:  seems to be quite alot of that lying around still. Finally I think the recovery console was one of those last minute throw in ideas from MS but I dont think they seriously ever expected people to actually make use of it. Also I dont know about you but I never found any helpful documenation on how you could use it either.

Ivan
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